TOPOLOGIES OF CULTURE(S) ON THE SEMIOTICS OF DRY STONE WALLS

words by Massimo Leone

A wall is a wall, but precisely for this reason it is also something living, signifying and not strictly referential. In any case, the object of analysis, however fascinating, is not the focal point of this text. Indeed, for however much the story of dry walls in relation to cement walls is fascinating and controversial, what really counts in this essay by Massimo Leone is the attempt to interpret a historical and cultural dynamic that lies at the basis of most contemporary phenomena. Organic food, interior design, fashion, weekend homes in the country, everything, in one way or another, points to a series of apparent contradictions that a new conception of technology, culture and economy in the western world brings with itself.

The picture below (1) represents a dry stone wall near Gagliano del Capo, a small village in Salento, South-East Italy. Dry stone walls (in Italian, ‘muretti a secco’) are a typical feature of the rural landscape of this region, but are also common in many other areas of the planet (from Connemara in Ireland to Napa Valley in California, etc.).

Dry stone walls are constructed from stones without any mortar to bind them together.
According to archeological evidence, starting from the Neolithic Age walls of this kind have been used to both mark the limits of a certain territory and obstruct the movement of animals and/or human beings. Dry stone walls have been built using several techniques, but the most common of them is the systematic accumulation of stones removed and collected while cultivating a field.
Whereas dry stone walls were the most common form of delimitation in the landscapes of several Italian (especially Southern and insular) regions at least until the first half of the Twentieth Century, after the Second World War and particularly after the Italian economic boom of the 1950s and 1960s, dry stone walls were progressively replaced by delimitation walls constructed from blocks (most frequently, concrete hollow blocks) and mortar. The following picture (2) represents one of these more recent walls, in the countryside of San Donato, a small village in Salento, South-East Italy.

The picture shows some of the characteristic features of the rural landscape of this latitude: a vigorous olive-tree, a field whose reddish color, stony texture, and low undergrowth are those typical of this region, and a perfectly blue sky. Yet, the visual syntax of this picture also contains some elements that seemingly contradict the rural nature of the landscape represented in it: a utility pole next to the olive-tree, the neatly plastered external wall of a large building, a chimney, some more buildings and a lamppost in the foreground, plastic litter, and, above all, a long wall in concrete hollow blocks across the entire picture.
Comparing the picture below (3) — which represents a long dry stone wall separating a poppy field from a wheat field on a background of wild rocks and olive-trees — with the picture above shows how determinant the two different walls are in bringing about either a rural connotation of the landscape or a non-rural connotation of it.

Nevertheless, this is not the only semantic opposition the two walls are related to. As it emerged from informal conversation with several contemporary observers, all more or less sharing the ‘aesthetic culture’ of present-day Southern Italy, most of them would react euphorically when observing the wall in picture 1 (“look, what a beautiful dry stone wall!!!”) and dysphorically when facing the wall in picture 2 (“look, what an ugly wall in concrete hollow blocks!!!”).
Architects and designers in present-day South-East Italy generally know very well that dry stone walls and walls in concrete hollow blocks carry different semantic and aesthetic connotations. They know that, at the moment, dry stone walls are ‘cool’ whereas walls in concrete hollow blocks are ‘for losers’. Entrusted with the task of planning the external landscape of a ‘rural’ hotel, for instance, they would never chose the latter, and would systematically adopt the former. However, although most architects and designers are perfectly able to play with these connotations, they rarely take time to wonder why these connotations exist, and why different connotations do not exist instead. This is, on the contrary, the primary goal of semioticians.

Several ‘semiotic’ questions can be asked about the opposition dry stone walls versus walls in concrete hollow blocks. For the purposes of the present talk, some of the most relevant are:

Why were dry stone walls progressively replaced by concrete block walls in post-Second World War South-East Italy, and why are concrete block walls progressively replaced by dry stone walls in present-day South-East Italy?
What are the structural oppositions between dry stone walls and concrete block walls?
What semantic oppositions are brought about by such structural oppositions, and why?
Why do these semantic oppositions include an aesthetic opposition between beauty (dry stone walls) and ugliness (concrete blocks walls)?
Can these replacements be interpreted as signs of a broader ‘cultural change’? What is this ‘cultural change’ and how is it signified by such apparently insignificant mutations in the syntax of the ‘rural’ landscape?

1. Why were dry stone walls progressively replaced by concrete block walls in post-Second World War South-East Italy, and why are concrete block walls progressively replaced by dry stone walls in present-day South-East Italy?

This first question is important also in order to stimulate an epistemological reflection on the relation between semiotics (especially cultural semiotics) and history (especially cultural history). Most historians, in particular those with a Marxist or post-Marxist background, will be tempted to answer: concrete block walls replaced dry stone walls for economic reasons, because the ‘invention’ of concrete blocks made constructing the former much cheaper and faster than constructing the latter.
However, such an economic explanation is too simplistic. Firstly because, even within an economic explanatory framework, the quickness and cheapness of concrete block walling in comparison with dry stone walling is far from being a matter of fact. On the one hand, stones removed from the field in order to prepare it for cultivation could be accumulated and arranged to construct a wall around it, the same activity therefore attaining two goals. Moreover, the construction technique was relatively simple, handed down throughout the centuries from generation to generation. On the other hand, concrete blocks as well as the ingredients for mortar had to be bought; they had to be transported from the factory or shop to the field, and a new technique had to be learned in order to arrange them in a wall.
Nowadays the situation has been completely reversed: dry stone walling has become more expensive than concrete block walling because few artisans remember this construction technique, to the point that currently Albanian artisans are contracted in South-East Italy to construct dry stone walls. However, projecting the present economic situation over the past would be a mistake: it is because the aesthetic culture of post-Second World War South-East Italy has progressively marginalized dry stone walling that this construction technique has become comparatively expensive, not vice versa. Hence, the passage from dry stone walls to concrete block walls, as well as the return from the latter to the former, must not be explained only in economic terms, but also in cultural terms. In this as in many other cases, the Marxist explanatory perspective must be reversed: sometimes, it is the cultural structure of a society that produces its economic structure, not only the other way around.
Second, even if the economic qualities of quickness and cheapness could explain the transition between two types of walling, the fact that such economic qualities are eminently cultural should not be neglected. Not all societies value quickness and cheapness in the same way. Those economists who claim the contrary might be too single-minded, as anthropological and historical literature on economic trends demonstrates. Furthermore, the fact that a society, or certain groups within it, value quickness and cheapness more than slowness and expensiveness is not exclusively an economic fact as some economists claim. On the contrary, it is a cultural fact. Generally speaking, even if economy is the infrastructure of culture, as Marxist cultural historians tend to assert, such infrastructure should be studied as a semiotic phenomenon, and within the framework of a cultural semiotics.
Within such a framework, the transition from dry stone walling to concrete block walling must be explained not in quantitative terms (which one is faster? which one is cheaper?), but in qualitative terms. What is the meaning of dry stone walling in relation to concrete block walling? To what model of culture do those who choose either of these two types of walling explicitly or, more often, implicitly adhere? The first step to take, within the framework of structural semiotics, is to discover and organize significant oppositions between the two objects under analysis.

2. What are the structural oppositions between dry stone walls and concrete blocks walls?

Oppositions can be divided into two groups: poietic oppositions (oppositions concerning the way in which walls are made) and aesthetic oppositions (oppositions concerning the way in which walls are perceived).

POIETIC OPPOSITIONS

Construction materials are found in a ‘here’
Versus
Construction materials are bought and transported from an ‘elsewhere’

Cultivating a field and building a wall around it are parts of the same activity
VS
Cultivating a field and building a wall around it are independent activities

Cultivating and walling progress simultaneously
VS
Cultivating and walling are not necessarily simultaneous activities

Walling is an indefinite process: stones can be added to the wall, or removed from it at any time
VS
Walling is a definite process: the usage of mortar makes it very difficult to remove concrete blocks; adding new concrete blocks cannot be a casual activity but requires extra mortar

AESTHETIC OPPOSITIONS

Stones are heterogeneous as regards their shape, color, topology, and texture
VS
Concrete blocks are homogeneous as regards their shape, color, topology, and texture

Dry stone walls delimitate the territory in an indefinite way
VS
Concrete block walls delimitate the territory in a definite way

Undergrowth can easily grow amidst the stones of a stone wall
VS
Undergrowth cannot easily grow amidst the blocks of a concrete block wall

Stone walls can be easily altered by external agents (other human beings, animals, atmospheric agents, etc.)
VS
Concrete block walls cannot be easily altered by external agents (other human beings, animals, atmospheric agents, etc.)

3. What semantic oppositions are brought about by such structural oppositions, and why?

The second step of the structural analysis consists in formulating hypotheses about what semantic oppositions could be at stake when dry stone walls and concrete block walls are considered as signifying artifacts characterized by opposite structural features.

The structural oppositions detected above seem to revolve around two thematic foci:

1) The relation between work and property;

2) The relation between time and property.

On the one hand, dry stone walls seem to embody and express a civilization in which the millenary activity of cultivation and the equally millenary activity of walling are mutually dependent. They are actually two aspects of the same phenomenon. Both removing stones from a field in order to cultivate it and walling it against the intrusions of other human beings or animals are activities that create not only a cultivation but also a culture: they impose an internal human order (absence of stones, presence of crops) and a social human order (inclusion of some animals, exclusion of others) on the order of nature, which is seen as chaos from the point of view of those who create a cultivation/culture. The field must be protected against both internal natural agents (stones continuously emerging from the ground) and against external animal agents (humans or other species trying to penetrate the field). The gesture that keeps the internal order of the field also creates its external order: creating a field in order to cultivate nature means also creating a wall in order to acculturate humans and the other animal species considered as part of the chaotic world of nature.
At the same time, dry stone walls also signify that the separation between the uncultivated land and the cultivated field, between animal nature without social order and animal nature with social order, is not a definite one. Stones that emerge from the field are not expelled but only marginalized, transformed into a wall that is a frontier but also a memento: new stones might emerge from the ground, and also new agents might dismantle the walls and construct them differently, according to a different project of cultivation/acculturation.

4. Why do these semantic oppositions include an aesthetic opposition between beauty (dry stone walls) and ugliness (concrete block walls)?

After all, the beauty that many see in dry stone walls might stem from the fact that they look like an order emerging from the chaos of nature almost spontaneously, almost naturally, growing like a natural element, like an organism, and therefore giving the impression that such a process of emersion is reversible, and can be followed by an equally spontaneous process of re-immersion of the order of the wall into the chaos of nature. In a dry stone wall, observers do not only admire the human ability of creating a cultural order from the chaos of nature, but also nature’s ability to create a natural chaos from the order of humans. Dry stone walls allow observers to see both processes through a transparency in which they both foreshadow and overshadow each other.

3bis. Which semantic oppositions are brought about by such structural oppositions, and why?

On the other hand, concrete block walls, by virtue of both their poietic and aesthetic features, seem to embody and express a civilization in which the millenary activity of cultivation and the equally millenary activity of walling are mutually independent. The sense of the relation between the (cultural) order of work and the (social) order of property is lost, to the point that a field can be walled without being cultivated, as in the case of the field represented in the picture analyzed above. At the same time, concrete block walls, with their chromatic, eidetic, topological, and textural regularity voice a civilization in which the sense of the relation between the order of work and property and the disorder of time is also lost. Stones removed from the field are not accumulated at its margins as a sort of memento of the precariousness of every cultural order; they are simply disposed of, hidden along with any sign that might remind observers of the natural chaos underlying every human order.

4bis. Why do these semantic oppositions include an aesthetic opposition between beauty (dry stone walls) and ugliness (concrete blocks walls) ?

As opposed to stones, concrete blocks, so perfectly regular, smooth and grey, so perfectly arranged and so irremovable thanks to the magic force of mortar, express the arrogant myth of a human will that marks the territory once and for all, excluding any further interference from either animate or inanimate agents. After all, if many see concrete block walls as ugly in comparison to dry stone walls it is also because the former seem to visually break the continuity between culture and nature that the latter embody. In expressing a conception of culture as permanent arrangement of nature, concrete block walls are a detriment of the idea of life. Denying the possibility of any re-arrangement, of any trespassing, they also convey a connotation of death, intended as the paralysis of nature.

5. Can these replacements be interpreted as signs of a broader ‘cultural change’? What is this ‘cultural change’ and how is it signified by such apparently insignificant mutations in the syntax of the ‘rural’ landscape?

If dry stone walls are interpreted as signs of a conception of work, property, and time based on the idea of continuity between the order of cultivation/culture and the (dis)order of nature, and concrete block walls are interpreted as signs of a conception of work, property, and time based on the idea of discontinuity between the order of cultivation/culture and the (dis)order of nature, THEN the transition from the former to the latter in post-Second World War Southern and insular Italy can be interpreted not as casual, but as linked with a broader cultural transition: the passage from pre-modernity to modernity, from rural to industrial culture, and from the civilization of the village to the civilization of the city - a passage that many areas in Southern and insular Italy went through starting from the late 1940s and on.
Nevertheless, in order for this interpretative hypothesis to be corroborated, the structure of the transition from dry stone walls to concrete block walls should by compared with the structures of other micro-transitions taking place in the same historical and socio-cultural context. For instance, is the transition from the use of dialect to the adoption of a regional variety of standard Italian in informal conversation among young educated people in South-East Italy from the 1950s onwards somehow comparable to the transition from dry stone walls to concrete block walls? Do both transitions express the same idea of creation of (agricultural, linguistic) identity through separation from a peculiar local context and through reference, instead, to a standardized national context?
Some final words must be spent regarding the cultural meaning of the re-adoption of dry stone walls in present-day South-East Italy, which is somehow paralleled by the current re-adoption of dialect in informal conversation among young educated people of the same region. Why are dry stone walls being constructed again in Salento and other Italian regions? What does this further transition in rural landscape mean from the point of view of cultural semiotics? Answering this question is important not only in order to refine the analysis of cultures (in this case, the architectural cultures of South-East Italy in the second half of the 20th Century and in the beginning of the 21st), but also in order to gain some insights into the culture that underlies the concepts and practice of semiotic analysis.
Until now, structural semiotic analysis has usually been Euclidean: given a transition from dry stone walls to concrete block walls — which embodies a transition from a civilization of continuity between nature and culture to a civilization of discontinuity between them — the opposite transition from concrete block walls to dry stone walls also embodies a symmetric transition from the latter civilization to the former. But this conclusion is wrong because it does not take into account time. Semiotic analysis therefore turns into semiotic paralysis: cultural objects become stereotypes of themselves. The analysis finds nothing but its presuppositions. It is not true that dry stone walls constructed in present-day South-East Italy bear the same meaning that they used to in the late 1940s.
On the contrary, a non-Euclidean semiotics adopts the postulate that, if denying a value A brings about a value -A, denying this value -A does not bring about the value A. It brings about, on the contrary, the value -(-A). This notation is necessary because it keeps memory of the fact that a negation of A took place before a negation of the negation of A. In spatial terms, being in a point A of the semiosphere (the sphere in which culture evolves) at a moment t1 of its history, and being in the same point A of the semiosphere in a moment t3 of its history, after a transition from point A to point B at a moment t2, is not the same. Actually, A at t1 and A at t3 are not the same, as the fragment A-B in the time t1-t2 is not the same as the fragment B-A in the time t2-t3. This is how Euclidean semiotics would represent the transition:



In non-Euclidean semiotics, cultural space is parabolic, and cultural trends that seem parallel actually touch at some point. A value reaffirmed after it was denied is not the same value as it was before denial. It is a value that keeps trace and memory of its denial. It is a value stained by the ghost of its disappearance, as well as by the ghost of the appearance of its opposite value. Inevitably, it ends up somehow resembling its opposite value.
This is not just metaphysical gibberish, nor is it a return to Hegel’s ontology of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. On the contrary, it is a practical remark about the fact that, excluding time and history from the analyses of cultural semiotics, as a certain Euclidean culture of semiotic analysis is inclined to do, one fails to understand that semantic structures that look like Euclidean spaces, when analyzed independently from their relation to time, turn into non-Euclidean, parabolic spaces when time is considered as a variable of cultural space.
This is why dry stone walls of present-day Salento cannot bear the same value and meaning as dry stone walls in the same region before the massive urbanization of South-East Italy. As in the following picture (5), attempts at recuperating a lost civilization often betray the impossibility of a return through kitsch compromises: the pathetic fake stone walling of a city roundabout with both stones AND mortar, for example.

The culture of analysis that currently characterizes structural semiotics sorely needs the creation of non-Euclidean models where semantic oppositions are represented while they get distorted by the temporal dimension. Only through such models will we be able to understand why building dry stone walls in the countryside of South-East Italy does not have the same meaning that it used to have, or why dialects rediscovered by present-day Italians do not bear the same values as dialects before Italy’s linguistic unity, or why religions rekindled after secularization do not hold the same place in the cultural semiosphere of contemporary societies, etc., etc.

Essential bibliography.
Brooks, Alan and Adcock, Sean. 1999. Dry Stone Walling, a Practical Handbook. Doncaster: BTCV.
Cagin, Louis and Nicolas, Laetitia. 2008. Construire en pierre sèche. Paris:editions Eyrolles.
Haberer, Martin. 2001. Steingärten und Trockenmauern. Stuttgart: Kosmos.
Lassure, Christian, ed. 1996. Construire et restaurer à pierre sèche.
(L’architecture vernaculaire, tome XX). Paris: CERAV.
Meys, Sofie. 2008. Lebensraum Trockenmauer. Bauanleitung, Gestaltung, Naturschutz.. Darmstadt: Pala-Verlag.
Murray-Wooley, Carolyn and Raitz, Karl. 1992. .Rock Fences of the Bluegrass, Lexington., KY: University Press of Kentucky.
Rainsford-Hannay, Colonel F. 1957. .Dry Stone Walling.. London: Faber &Faber.
Spitzer, Jana and Dittrich, Reiner. 2009. .Trockenmauern für den Garten – Bauanleitung und Gestaltungsideen.. Staufen bei Freiburg: Ökobuch Verlag.
The Dry Stone Walling Association. 2004. .Dry Stone Walling, Techniques and Traditions.. Milnthorpe, Cumbria: DSWA.
Tufnell, Richard, et al. 2009. .Trockenmauern. Anleitung für den Bau und die Reparatur.. Bern et al.: Haupt.







Un muro è un muro, ma proprio per questo è qualcosa di vivo, significativo e non strettamente referenziale. In ogni caso, va detto subito che l’oggetto d’analisi, per quanto affascinante, non è il punto focale di questo testo. Infatti, anche se la storia dei muretti a secco in relazione ai muri in cemento sia affascinante e controversa, quello che conta davvero in questo saggio di Massimo Leone è il tentativo di interpretare una dinamica storica e culturale alla base di gran parte dei fenomeni contemporanei. Il cibo bio, l’interior design, la moda, la seconda casa in campagna, tutto in qualche modo fa capo ad una serie di apparenti contraddizioni che una nuova concezione della tecnologia, della cultura e dell’economia nel mondo occidentale porta con sé.

La foto 1 rappresenta un muretto a secco nei pressi di Gagliano del Capo, un paesino del Salento. I muretti a secco sono un elemento tipico del paesaggio rurale di questa regione, ma è facile trovarli anche in altre zone del mondo (dal Connemara in Irlanda alla Napa Valley in California, etc.).

I muretti a secco sono costruiti utilizzando soltanto pietre, senza alcuna malta a tenerle insieme. Dai reperti archeologici risulta che muri di questo tipo siano stati utilizzati sin dal periodo Neolitico sia per marcare i limiti di un certo territorio sia per impedire il movimento di animali e/o esseri umani. Varie tecniche sono state utilizzate per costruire muretti a secco, ma la più comune è l’accumulazione sistematica di pietre rimosse e raccolte durante la coltivazione dei campi.
Mentre i muretti a secco rappresentavano la forma più comune di delimitazione nel paesaggio di molte regioni italiane (specialmente al sud e nelle isole) almeno fino alla metà del ventesimo secolo, dopo la seconda guerra mondiale, e in particolare dopo il boom economico degli anni ’50 e ’60, essi sono stati progressivamente sostituiti da muri di recinzione costruiti con mattoni (il più delle volte di cemento forato) e malta. La foto 2 mostra uno di questi muri più recenti nella campagna di San Donato, un altro paesino del Salento.

La foto contiene alcuni degli elementi caratteristici del paesaggio rurale di questa latitudine: un ulivo vigoroso, un campo in cui il colore rossastro, la consistenza pietrosa, e le sterpaglie sono quelli tipici di questa regione, e un cielo perfettamente azzurro. Ma la sintassi visiva di questa foto racchiude anche elementi che sembrano contraddire la natura rurale del paesaggio rappresentato: un palo della luce vicino all’ulivo, le pareti esterne di un grosso edificio, accuratamente intonacate, un comignolo, qualche altra costruzione, un lampione in primo piano, dei rifiuti di plastica e, a dominare lo sguardo, un lungo muro in mattoni di cemento forato che attraversa l’intera foto.
Messa a confronto con la foto 3 – la quale rappresenta un lungo muretto a secco che separa un campo di papaveri da uno di grano, su uno sfondo di rocce e ulivi – risulta evidente quanto la presenza delle due tipologie di muri sia determinante nel conferire al paesaggio una connotazione /rurale/ o /non-rurale/.
Tuttavia, questa non è l’unica opposizione semantica relativa alle due tipologie. Da alcune conversazioni informali con diversi osservatori contemporanei, che più o meno condividevano tutti la stessa “cultura estetica” del Sud Italia contemporaneo, è emerso che la maggior parte delle reazioni rispetto alla foto 1 sono state euforiche (“guarda che bel muretto a secco!!!”) e un po’ risentite di fronte alla foto 2 (“guarda che brutto muro in mattoni di cemento!!!”).
In generale, oggi gli architetti e i designer del Salento sanno bene che i muretti a secco e quelli in blocchi di cemento forato esprimono connotazioni estetiche e semantiche molto diverse. Sanno per esempio che, attualmente, i muretti a secco sono ‘cool’, mentre i muri in cemento no. Incaricati di progettare l’ambiente esterno di un agriturismo, per esempio, non sceglierebbero mai questi ultimi, ma invece adotterebbero sistematicamente i primi. Comunque, sebbene la maggior parte degli architetti e dei designer siano perfettamente in grado di giocare con queste connotazioni, raramente si concedono il tempo di riflettere sulle ragioni per cui queste connotazioni esistano al posto di altre. È questo, al contrario, l’obbiettivo primario dei semiotici.
Si possono porre diverse questioni ‘semiotiche’ rispetto all’opposizione /muretti a secco/ versus /muri in mattoni di cemento/. Tra quelle pertinenti allo scopo di questo testo, le più rilevanti sono:
1- Perché mai i muretti a secco sono stati gradualmente rimpiazzati da muri in mattoni di cemento nel Sud Est italiano del dopoguerra, e perché oggi nella stessa regione i muretti a secco stanno progressivamente ri-sostituendo quelli in cemento?
2- Quali sono le opposizioni strutturali tra muretti a secco e muri in mattoni di cemento?
3- Quali opposizioni semantiche sono generate da tali opposizioni strutturali, e perché?
4- Perché queste opposizioni semantiche includono un’opposizione estetica tra /bellezza/ (muretti a secco) e /bruttezza/ (muri in mattoni di cemento)?
5- Queste sostituzioni possono forse essere interpretate come segno di un più ampio ‘cambiamento culturale’? Qual è questo ‘cambiamento culturale’? E come trova espressione all’interno di tali mutazioni, apparentemente insignificanti, nella sintassi del paesaggio ‘rurale’?

1. Perché mai i muretti a secco sono stati gradualmente rimpiazzati da muri in mattoni di cemento nel Sud Est italiano del dopoguerra, e perché oggi nella stessa regione i muretti a secco stanno progressivamente ri-sostituendo quelli in cemento?

Questa prima domanda è importante anche al fine di stimolare una riflessione epistemologica sulla relazione tra semiotica (in special modo la semiotica culturale) e storia (in special modo la storia culturale). Molti storici, soprattutto quelli con una formazione Marxista o post-Marxista, saranno tentati di rispondere: i mattoni di cemento hanno sostituito i muretti a secco per ragioni economiche, perché l’invenzione di tali mattoni ha reso la costruzione con questi materiali meno cara e veloce di quella dei muretti a secco.
Tuttavia, una spiegazione economica di questo tipo è troppo semplicistica. Prima di tutto perché, anche all’interno di un quadro economico, la velocità e la convenienza dei muri in mattoni di cemento a confronto con quelli a secco è lungi dall’essere un dato di fatto. Da una parte, le pietre rimosse dal campo al fine di prepararne la coltivazione potevano essere accatastate per costruirne una recinzione, di modo che la stessa azione conseguiva due scopi differenti. In più, la tecnica di costruzione era relativamente semplice, tramandata da generazione in generazione attraverso i secoli. Dall’altra parte, i mattoni di cemento, così come i materiali per la malta, devono essere comprati, devono essere trasportati dalla fabbrica o dal negozio fino al campo, e una nuova tecnica deve essere imparata al fine di trasformare questi elementi in un muro.

Oggi la situazione si è completamente rovesciata: i muretti a secco sono diventati più costosi dei muri in mattoni di cemento, in quanto solo pochi muratori conoscono ancora questa tecnica di costruzione, al punto che al momento per costruire muretti a secco nel Sud Est italiano si chiamano soprattutto muratori albanesi, i quali ancora conoscono questa tecnica. In ogni modo, proiettare la situazione economica di oggi sul passato sarebbe un errore: è per il fatto che l’estetica culturale del dopoguerra ha progressivamente marginalizzato la costruzione di muretti a secco che questa tecnica è diventata più costosa, non viceversa. Ergo, il passaggio dai muretti a secco ai muri in mattoni di cemento, così come il ritorno dei primi a scapito dei secondi, non deve essere spiegato solo in termini economici, ma anche in termini culturali. In questo, come in molti altri casi, la prospettiva esplicativa Marxista deve essere rigirata: a volte, è la struttura culturale di una società che produce la sua struttura economica, non solo viceversa.
Secondo, anche se le qualità economiche di velocità e convenienza potessero spiegare la transizione tra i due tipi di tipologia muraria, non si dovrebbe trascurare il fatto che queste stesse qualità economiche sono profondamente culturali. Non tutte le società valorizzano la velocità e la convenienza allo stesso modo. Come dimostrato anche dalla letteratura antropologica e storica in relazione alle tendenze economiche, quegli economisti che sostengono il contrario propongono forse spiegazioni troppo semplicistiche. Oltretutto, il fatto che una società, o alcuni gruppi al suo interno, valorizzino maggiormente la velocità e la convenienza rispetto alla lentezza e alla dispendiosità non è solo un fatto economico, come pretendono alcuni economisti. Al contrario, è un fatto culturale. Parlando in generale, anche se l’economia fosse l’infrastruttura della cultura, come sostengono gli storici della cultura di stampo Marxista, tale infrastruttura dovrebbe essere studiata come fenomeno semiotico, e all’interno della cornice di una semiotica culturale.
In un quadro del genere, la transizione dai muretti a secco a quelli in mattoni di cemento deve essere spiegata non in senso quantitativo (quale delle due tecniche è più veloce? Quale delle due è meno cara?), ma in termini qualitativi. Che significa costruire muretti a secco invece di muri in mattoni di cemento? A quale modello culturale aderiscono in modo esplicito o – ancora più spesso –implicito coloro che scelgono l’una o l’altra di queste due tipologie murarie? Il primo passo da compiere nel quadro di una semiotica strutturale è quello di scoprire e organizzare le opposizioni significanti tra i due oggetti dell’analisi.

2. Quali sono le opposizioni strutturali tra i muretti a secco e i muri in mattoni di cemento?
Le opposizioni possono essere organizzate in due gruppi: opposizioni poietiche (che concernono il modo in cui i muri vengono costruiti) ed opposizioni estetiche (che concernono il modo in cui i muri vengono percepiti).

OPPOSZIONI POIETICHE

I materiali per la costruzione vengono trovati in un ‘qui’
Versus
I materiali per la costruzione sono comprati e trasportati da un ‘altrove’

Coltivare un campo e costruirvi un muro di cinta sono parte della stessa attività
VS
Coltivare un campo e costruirvi un muro di cinta sono attività indipendenti

La coltivazione e la costruzione procedono simultaneamente
VS
La coltivazione e la costruzione non procedono necessariamente in modo simultaneo

Costruire muri è un processo indefinito: le pietre possono essere aggiunte o rimosse in ogni momento
VS
Costruire muri è un processo definito: l’uso della malta rende molto difficile rimuovere i mattoni; aggiungere nuovi mattoni non può essere un’attività casuale e richiede malta aggiuntiva


OPPOSIZIONI ESTETICHE

Le pietre sono eterogenee per quanto riguarda forma, colore, tipologia, e testura
VS
I mattoni di cemento sono omogenei in quanto a forma, colore, tipologia e testura

I muretti a secco delimitano il territorio in modo indefinito
VS
I muri in mattoni di cemento delimitano il territorio in modo definito

Le erbacce crescono con facilità tra le pietre di un muretto a secco
VS
Le erbacce non crescono con facilità tra i mattoni di cemento

I muretti a secco possono essere facilmente modificati da agenti esterni (altri esseri umani, animali, agenti atmosferici, etc.)
VS
I muri in mattoni di cemento possono essere modificati con difficoltà da agenti esterni (altri esseri umani, animali, agenti atmosferici, etc.)

3. Quali opposizioni semantiche sono generate da tali opposizioni strutturali, e perché?
Il secondo passo dell’analisi strutturale consiste nel formulare ipotesi su come certe opposizioni semantiche possano essere in gioco quando i muretti a secco e quelli in mattoni di cemento sono considerati come artefatti significativi caratterizzati da tratti strutturali opposti.

Le opposizioni strutturali appena citate sembrano ruotare attorno a due focalizzazioni tematiche:

1) La relazione tra lavoro e proprietà;

2) La relazione tra tempo e proprietà.

Da un lato, i muretti a secco sembrano incorporare ed esprimere una civiltà nella quale l’attività millenaria di coltivazione e l’altrettanto millenaria attività di costruzione di muri sono mutuamente dipendenti. Sono in effetti due aspetti dello stesso fenomeno. Entrambe le attività, quella di rimuovere le pietre dal campo al fine di poterlo coltivare e quella di costruirgli intorno un muro di cinta per impedire l’intrusione di altri esseri umani o animali, sono attività che creano non solo una coltivazione ma anche una cultura: un ordine umano di tipo interno (assenza di pietre, presenza di coltivazioni) e un ordine umano di tipo sociale (inclusione di certi animali, esclusione di certi altri) sono imposti sull’ordine naturale, che viene visto come caos dal punto di vista di chi crea la coltura/cultura. Il campo deve essere protetto sia dagli agenti interni, inanimati (le pietre che emergono continuamente dal suolo), che da quelli esterni, animati (esseri umani o altre specie che tentano di penetrare nel campo). Il gesto che crea e mantiene l’ordine interno del campo crea e mantiene anche il suo ordine esterno: creare un campo con lo scopo di coltivarne la natura significa anche creare un muro per acculturare gli esseri umani e gli altri animali, considerati come parte del caos naturale.
Allo stesso tempo, i muretti a secco significano anche che la separazione tra la terra non-coltivata e il campo coltivato, tra la natura animale senza ordine sociale e la natura animale con un ordine sociale, non è cosa definita. Le pietre che emergono dal terreno non sono espulse, ma solo marginalizzate, trasformate in un muro che è una frontiera ma anche un memento: nuove pietre potrebbero spuntare dal suolo, così come nuovi agenti potrebbero smantellare i muri e costruirli in modo differente, secondo un diverso progetto di coltivazione/acculturazione.

4. Perché queste opposizioni semantiche includono un’opposizione estetica tra /bellezza/ (muretti a secco) e /bruttezza/ (muri in mattoni di cemento)?
In fin dei conti, la bellezza che molti vedono nei muretti a secco potrebbe scaturire dal fatto che essi sembrano un ordine emerso dal caos naturale in modo quasi spontaneo, quasi naturale, crescendo come un elemento della natura, come un organismo, e dando quindi l’impressione che tale processo di emersione sia reversibile, e che possa essere seguito da un altrettanto spontaneo processo di ri-immersione dell’ordine del muro nel caos della natura. In un muretto a secco, gli osservatori ammirano non solo l’abilità umana di creare un ordine culturale dal caos della natura, ma anche l’abilità della natura di creare un caos naturale dall’ordine umano. I muretti a secco permettono agli osservatori di vedere entrambi i processi, come in una trasparenza nella quale essi si adombrano e si fanno ombra reciprocamente.

3bis. Quali opposizioni semantiche sono generate da tali opposizioni strutturali, e perché?
D’altro canto, i muri in mattoni di cemento, in forza delle loro caratteristiche poietiche ed estetiche, sembrano incorporare ed esprimere una civiltà nella quale l’attività millenaria di coltivazione e l’altrettanto millenaria attività di costruzione muraria sono mutuamente indipendenti. Il senso della relazione tra l’ordine (culturale) del lavoro e l’ordine (sociale) della proprietà si perde, al punto che un campo può essere recintato senza essere coltivato, come nel caso del campo nella foto analizzata in precedenza. Allo stesso tempo, i muri in mattoni di cemento, con la loro regolarità cromatica, eidetica, topologica e di testura, danno voce a una civiltà nella quale si smarrisce il senso della relazione tra l’ordine di lavoro e proprietà e il disordine del tempo. Le pietre rimosse dal campo non sono accumulate ai suoi margini come una sorta di memento della precarietà di ogni ordine culturale; esse sono semplicemente eliminate, nascoste insieme a ogni segno che possa ricordare all’osservatore il disordine naturale che sottende ogni ordine umano.

4bis. Perché queste opposizioni semantiche includono un’opposizione estetica tra /bellezza/ (muretti a secco) e /bruttezza/ (muri in mattoni di cemento)?
Diversamente dalle pietre, i mattoni di cemento, così perfettamente regolari, levigati, grigi, così perfettamente disposti e irremovibili a causa della ‘magica’ forza della malta, esprimono il mito arrogante di una volontà umana che delimita il territorio una volta per tutte, escludendo così ogni ulteriore interferenza da parte di agenti animati o inanimati. Dopotutto, se molti ritengono i muri in mattoni di cemento così brutti rispetto a quelli a secco è anche perché i primi sembrano rompere visivamente quella continuità tra cultura e natura che i secondi invece incorporano. Esprimendo una concezione della cultura come organizzazione permanente della natura, i blocchi di cemento lo fanno a discapito dell’idea di vita. Negando la possibilità di qualsiasi ri-arrangiamento, di qualsiasi sconfinamento, esprimono altresì una connotazione di morte, intesa come paralisi della natura.

5. Queste sostituzioni possono forse essere interpretate come segno di un più ampio ‘cambiamento culturale’? Qual è questo ‘cambiamento culturale’? E come trova espressione all’interno di tali mutazioni, apparentemente insignificanti, nella sintassi del paesaggio ‘rurale’?
SE i muretti a secco vengono interpretati come segni di una concezione del lavoro, della proprietà e del tempo basata sull’idea di continuità tra l’ordine della coltura/cultura e il (dis)ordine della natura, laddove i muri in mattoni di cemento vengono interpretati come segni di una concezione del lavoro, della proprietà e del tempo basata sull’idea di discontinuità tra l’ordine della coltura/cultura e il (dis)ordine della natura, ALLORA il passaggio dai primi ai secondi, verificatosi nel secondo dopoguerra nel sud e nelle isole italiane, può essere interpretato non come fatto casuale, ma come fatto collegato a una più ampia transizione culturale: il passaggio dalla pre-modernità alla modernità, dalla cultura rurale a quella industriale, e dalla civiltà del paese a quella della città, un passaggio che molte aree del sud e delle isole italiane hanno compiuto a partire dai tardi anni ’40.
Tuttavia, affinché questa ipotesi interpretativa possa essere corroborata, la struttura della transizione dai muretti a secco a quelli in mattoni di cemento dovrebbe essere messa a confronto con quella di altre micro-transizioni che hanno avuto luogo nello stesso periodo storico e nel medesimo contesto socio-culturale. Per esempio, è forse possibile paragonare il passaggio dai muretti a secco a quelli in mattoni di cemento con quello, avvenuto a partire dagli anni ’50, dall’utilizzo del dialetto nelle conversazioni informali tra giovani istruiti a favore dell’adozione di una variante regionale dell’italiano standard? Queste transizioni esprimono forse entrambe la stessa idea di creazione di un’identità (agricola, linguistica) attraverso l’allontanamento da un contesto locale specifico a favore, invece, di un riferimento al contesto nazionale standardizzato?
Infine, è necessario soffermarsi sul significato culturale della ri-adozione dei muretti a secco nel Sud-Est italiano d’oggi, che è in qualche modo parallelo a quello dell’attuale ri-adozione del dialetto nelle conversazioni informali tra i giovani, anche istruiti, della stessa regione. Perché nel Salento e in altre regioni si costruiscono di nuovo muretti a secco? Cosa significa quest’ulteriore cambiamento nel paesaggio rurale dal punto di vista della semiotica culturale? Rispondere a questa domanda è importante non solo per affinare l’analisi delle culture (in questo caso la cultura architettonica del Sud-Est italiano nella seconda metà del ventesimo secolo e all’inizio del ventunesimo), ma anche per comprendere più a fondo la cultura che è alla base dei concetti e della pratica dell’analisi semiotica.
Finora, l’analisi semiotica strutturale è stata per lo più euclidea: data una transizione dai muretti a secco verso quelli in mattoni di cemento – che incarna il passaggio da una civiltà della continuità a una civiltà della discontinuità tra natura e cultura – la transizione opposta dai muri in mattoni di cemento ai muretti a secco incarna anche un passaggio simmetrico dalla prima civiltà alla seconda. Ma una conclusione del genere è sbagliata, perché non tiene conto del tempo. L’analisi semiotica si volge allora in paralisi semiotica: gli oggetti culturali diventano stereotipi di se stessi. L’analisi non fa che conseguire i suoi presupposti. Non è vero che i muretti a secco costruiti oggi nel Sud-Est italiano hanno lo stesso significato che avevano nei tardi anni ’40.
Al contrario, una semiotica non-euclidea adotta il postulato che, se la negazione di un valore A porta ad un valore -A, negare nuovamente questo valore -A non porta necessariamente al valore A. Porta invece al valore -(-A). Questa notazione è necessaria perché conserva traccia del fatto che la negazione di A ha luogo prima della negazione della negazione di A. In termini spaziali, stando in un punto A della semiosfera (la sfera nella quale la cultura si evolve) in un momento t1 della sua storia, e stare nello stesso punto A della semiosfera in un momento t3 della sua storia, a seguito della transizione dal punto A al punto B nel momento t2, non sono la stessa cosa. In realtà, A in t1 e A in t3 non sono equivalenti, così come il segmento A-B nel tempo t1-t2 non è lo stesso che il segmento B-A nel tempo t2-t3.

Questo è il modo in cui la semiotica euclidea rappresenterebbe la transizione:




Nella semiotica non-euclidea, lo spazio culturale è parabolico, e le tendenze culturali che sembrano parallele finiscono invece col toccarsi in qualche punto. Un valore riaffermato dopo che è stato negato non è lo stesso valore di quando ancora non era stato negato. È un valore che tiene traccia e memoria della sua negazione. È un valore macchiato dal fantasma della sua scomparsa, così come dal fantasma dell’apparire del suo valore opposto. Inevitabilmente, è un valore che finisce con l’assomigliare in qualche modo al suo valore opposto.
Tutto questo non è solo un farfugliare metafisico, non è neanche un ritorno alla tesi, antitesi e sintesi dell’ontologia di Hegel. Al contrario, è un’osservazione pratica sul fatto che, escludendo il tempo e la storia dalle analisi della semiotica culturale, così come una certa cultura euclidea dell’analisi semiotica tende a fare, non si riesce a capire che alcune strutture semantiche, le quali sembrano spazi euclidei se analizzate indipendentemente dalla loro relazione col tempo, diventano spazi non-euclidei, parabolici, quando il tempo viene considerato come una variabile dello spazio culturale.
È per questo che i muretti a secco nel Salento di oggi non possono assumere lo stesso valore e lo stesso significato di quelli che esistevano nella stessa regione prima dell’intensa urbanizzazione del Sud Est italiano. Come si vede nella foto 5s, i tentativi di recuperare una civiltà perduta spesso tradiscono l’impossibilità di un tale ritorno proprio nel tentativo di un compromesso kitsch: per esempio, i patetici muretti a secco finti di una rotonda di città, con pietre E calce.

La cultura dell’analisi che caratterizza oggi la semiotica strutturale ha fortemente bisogno della creazione di modelli non-euclidei dove le opposizioni semantiche siano rappresentate mentre subiscono una distorsione a causa della dimensione temporale. Solo attraverso questi modelli saremo in grado di capire perché costruire muretti a secco nella campagna del Sud-Est italiano non ha lo stesso significato che aveva un tempo, o perché i dialetti riscoperti dagli Italiani di oggi non veicolano gli stessi valori di prima dell’unificazione linguistica dell’Italia, o perché le religioni, rivificatesi dopo la secolarizzazione, non occupano lo stesso posto nella semiosfera culturale delle società contemporanee, etc., etc.


Massimo Leone insegna Semiotica della Cultura presso la Facoltà di Lettere e Filosofia dell'Università di Torino. È stato visiting professor in molte università del mondo e ha pubblicato numerosi studi, soprattutto sulla semiotica delle culture visive.

(01/5)