TOUCHABLES

by michele manfellotto

TOUCHABLES

First part of an ongoing investigation into the sentimental properties of reproduced experiences

I’ve made “descriptions.” That’s all I know about my criticism. And “descriptions” of what? Of other “descriptions,” because that’s all books are. Anthropology teaches us as much: there’s [...] the fact, the thing that happened, the myth and [...] its spoken description.


Pier Paolo Pasolini, Descrizioni di descrizioni,
ed. Graziella Chiarcossi, Einaudi 1979

1987 was the year Reagan and Gorbachev signed the first treaty on the elimination of nuclear missiles; it was the year of the third and last Thatcher government and the year that Fox aired the first ever Simpsons episode.
In 1987 Microsoft presented the second version of Windows – the first one with icons – and my neighborhood, a residential area in the north part of Rome, got its first video rental store.
I was ten years old and I saw Brian De Palma’s The Untouchables for the first time. It had a enormous impact on me.
In the first place, I was stunned by the realism of the violent scenes, all of them very literal. I wasn’t familiar with horror films and that was the first movie where I saw blood flowing freely: what’s more, the blood was black, a detail that despite my having no experience of murdered corpses made it look all the more realistic to me.
In De Palma’s movie the struggle between good and evil is very clearly outlined. But the contrast struck me as particularly dramatic, especially when the good guys died: the killings are heinous and the cruelty of the bad guys gave me a distinct sense of threat, wild, gripping.
The sequence that stuck forever in my memory is the one where Capone’s favorite hit man kills the group’s bookkeeper, played by Charles Martin Smith.
The bookkeeper takes the elevator and doesn’t realize that the guy conducting it is the hit man in disguise. At that point, the film cuts to Kevin Costner and Sean Connery: they’ve found out about the plot and they’re going to help the bookkeeper, but it’s too late. We don’t see him die: the next scene shows his corpse, and towering over it the word TOUCHABLES, which the killer has written in blood.
In the film, “untouchables” is the moniker that the press uses to refer to the good guys: it alludes to their absolute incorruptibility, a trait which makes them virtually invulnerable.
After that, a number of rappers go on to call themselves “untouchable,” but they’re referring to the bad guy, Al Capone, who in The Untouchables bares the unmistakable smirk of the great Bob De Niro.
Untouchable then comes to mean “above the law” and the definition itself acquires still greater force once it’s automatically associated with traits belonging to other De Niro characters – normal individuals that a Darwinian necessity transforms into criminals whose antisocial conduct embodies a political attitude: which is exactly how the rappers who lead hip hop to maturity in the nineties see themselves.
Significantly, the appropriation of the term “untouchable” in this context follows upon the enormous success of Goodfellas and Casino, released years after The Untouchables.
Scorsese’s two monumental films mark the definitive consolidation of Robert De Niro as the ideal cinematic gangster in the global collective imaginary. But aside from the obvious deviation of meaning entailed by the reference to Al Capone, the gangster par excellence, this particular use of the term “untouchable” takes us back precisely to the scene where the bookkeeper gets killed.
The boss’s hit man, who with macabre coquetry wears only white, doesn’t limit himself to physically eliminating the enemy, but takes the time to also get him on a symbolic level: he desecrates the name’s function, destroying its mythic reach by proving to everyone that the purity of the souls of the famous Untouchables doesn’t protect them from the lead of Capone.
Adding his terrifying caption to the massacre, the hit man effectively reveals himself master of a language that he not only understands but places at the service of his own criminal intentions.
The film’s narrative therefore already contains a text that lends itself to being modified for expressive purposes: the journalistic definition of “untouchables” is deliberately altered by a character who aims to shift its mediatic force. Which is a little more subtle than a simple play on words.
The linguistic operation carried out by the hit man struck my imagination with some force, making me forever sensitive to that kind of communication.
The following year, 1988, the older brother of a friend of mine made me a tape of LL Cool J’s Bigger and Deffer and Public Enemy’s It Takes a Nation of Millions: the latter had a song called Rebel Without a Pause on it, which I didn’t understand because I wasn’t yet familiar with the James Dean movie.
In fact, I saw Rebel Without a Cause while studying for a film history exam when I was twenty.
You all know the story. James Dean is Jim Stark, an adolescent in conflict with his blindly conformist family; he fails to make friends at school and a group of bullies decides to pick on him. In order to get them to accept him, Jim agrees to an extreme show of courage, but his rival dies in the ensuing accident, while he survives.
At that point, I thought I remembered a scene in which the director, Nicholas Ray, shows the umpteenth fight between Jim Stark and his father like this: the boy has his back turned and is talking to his father, but the father is off-screen for the entire duration of the monologue, excluded from the frame. The conflict between the two generations is expressed by a simple figure, as clear as it is intense: such a determined formal choice applied to a theme of that sort couldn’t not impress me at the age of twenty. Last week I watched Rebel Without a Cause twice just to find that scene, but I didn’t find it. I promised myself that I would watch it a third time, but I suspect that the scene I’ve described for you is a product of my memory. Which would have, in other words, selected and recombined elements of the film with other material present in my cultural baggage, giving life to an utterly personal synthesis that is meaningful for me: a copy, a version for the benefit of my own private experience.
I found myself once again thinking that the principle attribute that our society demands of any cultural product is that it be freely modifiable by whoever receives it. The division of the arts is no longer necessary in the market of ideas, the concept of genre disappears in the magma of a pop culture that assimilates every mode of expression and gives it back in the form of a consumer good: the product is completely identified with the cultural act – that is, with the experience of its fruition in reality – and presents itself as a brand new human phenomenon that is at once intense hedonistic entertainment, conscious identity choice, and mirror of the thousand faces of social life, which culture thus justifies and legitimizes in its fixed forms. From the sophisticated pessimism of Larry David to the illiterate psychedelia of a rapper like Lil B, the infinite abundance of models, extremely varied but all equally flexible, takes its place alongside our real image: the tension that derives from this ends up defining first our behavior, and then our deepest being, in accordance with a process of individual identity construction that technology has rendered completely automatic and spontaneous, and therefore inexorable.
These public darlings have to be real in order to function. But where does the real Larry David end and the character begin? In Curb Your Enthusiasm David acts himself and lots of other famous actors appear in the series because they are his friends in real life.
If this tension wasn’t there, if, that is, the fiction itself didn’t at times contain elements intended to suggest that what we’re watching isn’t fiction but reality, then the mechanism would be more difficult to set in motion: the confusion between the real David and the fictional one reproduces the confusion that each one of us experiences in the everyday tension between our own lived reality and the imaginary models that are superimposed over it.
In this respect then, even the success of figures who have romantically pursued the fusion of art and life could be due not to a shift in mentality or a change of perspective in the dominant culture, but to a mutation in the dynamics of perception.
This includes the good fortune of those who, like James Dean, have ended up becoming icons despite themselves.
His death in a car accident occurs less than a month prior to the release of Rebel Without a Cause and it’s this tragically spectacular event that adds to any reading of James Dean a mythological depth that transcends his talents as an actor. It’s 1955. In Pier Paolo Pasolini’s fulminating definition, death concludes a biography and gives it meaning, like the final edit of a film.
In Pasolini’s study of cinematic language the reflections on the Abraham Zapruder footage, which captures the assassination of JFK, play a central role.
But in 1955 the United States senator John Fitzgerald Kennedy is undergoing a series of back surgeries: he’ll risk dying, he’ll even receive his last rites, but he’ll pull through, win the elections and, in 1963, he’ll show up in Dallas just on time to let a Jewish tailor shoot the most important amateur footage in the history of cinema.
In addition to forever influencing the representation of violence, and not only in American cinema, Zapruder’s film will reveal, in a literally explosive way, the potentialities of a non-professional film, placing the relationship between reality and filmic representation at the center of the debate. It’s no doubt thanks to the processes set in motion by Zapruder’s film that, some twenty five years later, Francis Ford Coppola will come to prophecy, from the depths of the Philippine jungles, that the future aesthetics of cinema will be determined by amateurs.
Though I wasn’t able to find the scene I was looking for in Rebel Without a Cause, I did find another sequence that struck me, in this sense, as particularly valuable.
Prior to the tragic finale, James Dean hides in an abandoned villa. With him is Judy, the girl he loves, played by Natalie Wood, and Plato, Sal Mineo, a troubled boy who mythicizes him and considers him a hero. Plato’s character, the first more or less explicitly gay adolescent to ever appear in cinema, is the one who will lead the situation to precipitate with his self-destructiveness; but when the three arrive at the villa, it’s precisely Plato that enables the constitution of a momentary and impossible deviant family nucleus.
Plato dozes off and the two sweethearts watch him sleeping: then they realize that his socks are mismatched, one red and one blue.
The frame chosen by Nicholas Ray shows us Plato stretched out with the socks in plain sight, and next to him the captivated couple. It’s a kind of nativity, a primal scene.
James Dean and Natalie Wood are deeply touched by the absent-mindedness of their ideal child because it represents, in and of itself, the disavowal of an entire value system. The mistake thus becomes a sign of recognition, a declaration of identity, a language, and is able to take on an aesthetic value.
James Dean’s clothes are also red and blue and they seem to evoke the colors of Plato’s socks along two diagonal lines that intersect harmoniously.
In other words, Plato’s social attitude is so immediately deciphered and shared by his friends that his having mismatched the socks appears like the synthesis of a world view, a mark of style, which they understand and even find beautiful.
At the dawn of rock ‘n’ roll, Rebel Without a Cause already adopts an aesthetic attitude that prefigures Francis Ford Coppola’s hypothesis, at least in a poetic sense.
Throughout his life, Nick Ray will make his public appearances in a red button-up shirt, as though citing the outfit of his hero. And he will wear a red shirt in almost all of the scenes of Lightning Over Water, Wim Wenders’ disturbing and controversial work on the director’s last days. Cinema and reality, life and death: in the vision of a terminally ill Ray, opposites are complementary and the end gives meaning to the beginning.
But there’s no need to have lived the legend in the first person in order for the cinema to seep into your bones.
As Pasolini continuously theorizes in the writings collected in Heretical Empiricism, the instruments we use to read a cinematic image are the same ones we use to decipher a piece of reality: our senses are involved in it and the very narrative of the filmic story reproduces the structure of dream and memory, proceeding by way of synthetic figures.
How much of our memory do we owe to lived life and how much instead to the reproduced experiences that emerge from the infinite flux of the audiovisual?
Sal Mineo’s socks in Rebel Without a Cause are maybe the first ingenuous manifestation of an era that has looked increasingly towards the abstract freedom of art to sublimate the void left by the great hypothesis of social transformation.
So, that same 1955 when James Dean dies is also the year that Michael J. Fox returns to from the future in his DeLorean: and in Back to the Future the comic function is entirely entrusted to icons, while the greatness of American capitalism is celebrated by completely identifying it with its imaginary dimension.
The very nature of our memory seems to mutate in contact with reproduced experiences, which are camouflaged amongst our real memories, contributing to the formation of the knowledge at the basis of our identity. That’s why we’re vulnerable in front of the screen, touchables: because for us, watching a movie is more than entertainment, it’s a sentimental operation.

(to be continued)




Ho fatto delle “descrizioni”. Ecco tutto quello che so della mia critica. E “descrizioni” di che cosa? Di altre “descrizioni”, che altro i libri non sono. L’antropologia l’insegna: c’è (…) il fatto, la cosa occorsa, il mito, e (…) la sua descrizione parlata.

Pier Paolo Pasolini, Descrizioni di descrizioni,
ed. Graziella Chiarcossi, Einaudi 1979


Il 1987 fu l’anno in cui Reagan e Gorbachev firmarono il primo trattato per l’eliminazione dei missili nucleari; fu l’anno del terzo e ultimo governo Tatcher e l’anno in cui la Fox mandò in onda la prima puntata dei Simpson.
Nel 1987 Microsoft presentò la seconda versione di Windows, la prima con le icone, e nel mio quartiere, una zona residenziale nella parte nord di Roma, aprì il primo noleggio di videocassette.
Avevo dieci anni e allora vidi per la prima volta The Untouchables di Brian De Palma, che mi fece un’impressione grandissima.
Prima di tutto mi colpì il realismo delle scene di violenza, tutte molto letterali. Non conoscevo il cinema horror e quello era il primo film in cui vedevo il sangue scorrere senza risparmio: in più il sangue era nero, dettaglio che, nonostante non avessi esperienza alcuna di morti ammazzati, mi sembrò ancora più realistico.
Nel film di De Palma la lotta tra il bene e il male è delineata in modo molto chiaro. Ma il contrasto mi pareva particolarmente drammatico, specie quando morivano i buoni: le esecuzioni sono efferate e la crudeltà dei cattivi mi trasmetteva un senso netto di minaccia, brado, coinvolgente.
La sequenza che si fermò per sempre nella mia memoria è quella in cui il sicario prediletto di Capone uccide il contabile del gruppo, interpretato da Charles Martin Smith.
Il contabile prende l’ascensore e non si accorge che l’uomo che lo manovra è il sicario travestito. Da qui il montaggio segue Kevin Costner e Sean Connery: hanno scoperto la trappola e vanno a soccorrere il contabile, ma è tardi. Non lo vediamo morire: la scena successiva ce lo mostra cadavere, sovrastato dalla parola TOUCHABLES, che l’assassino ha scritto con il sangue.
“Intoccabili” è l’appellativo con cui, nel film, la stampa si riferisce ai buoni: allude alla loro incorruttibilità assoluta, che li rende virtualmente invulnerabili.
In seguito più di un rapper si definirà “intoccabile”: ma facendo riferimento al cattivo, Al Capone, che in The Untouchables ha la smorfia inconfondibile del grande Bob De Niro.
Intoccabile allora significherà “al di sopra della legge” e la definizione stessa acquisterà anche maggior forza quando ad essa si sovrapporranno automaticamente i caratteri propri di altri personaggi interpretati da De Niro, individui normali che una darwiniana necessità trasforma in criminali la cui condotta antisociale è di per sé una presa di posizione politica: ed è proprio così che sembrano vedere se stessi i rapper che portano l’hip hop alla maturità negli anni novanta del novecento.
Significativamente, il recupero del termine “intoccabile” in questo ambito seguirà il successo clamoroso di Goodfellas e Casino, usciti diversi anni dopo The Untouchables.
I due film monumentali di Scorsese segnano la definitiva consacrazione nell’immaginario collettivo mondiale di Robert De Niro come gangster cinematografico ideale. Ma al di là dell’ovvia deviazione di significato rappresentata dal riferimento al gangster per antonomasia, Al Capone, questo particolare utilizzo del termine “intoccabile” ci riporta proprio alla sequenza del film in cui il contabile viene ammazzato.
Il sicario preferito del boss, che con macabra civetteria veste solo di bianco, non si limita a eliminare fisicamente il nemico, ma si preoccupa di colpirlo anche sul piano simbolico: ne dissacra l’operato, di cui mina la portata mitica provando a chiunque che la purezza d’animo dei famosi Untouchables non protegge dal piombo di Capone. Aggiungendo al massacro la sua didascalia terrificante, il sicario si dimostra, in pratica, padrone di un linguaggio, che comprende e volge ai propri propositi criminali.
Ecco che già all’interno della narrativa del film compare un testo che si presta a essere modificato a fini espressivi: la definizione giornalistica “intoccabili”, che viene deliberatamente alterata da un personaggio allo scopo di mutarne di segno la forza mediatica. Qualcosa di più sottile dunque di un semplice gioco di parole.
L’operazione linguistica compiuta dal sicario colpì la mia immaginazione in modo decisivo, rendendomi sensibile per sempre a questo tipo di comunicazione.
L’anno successivo, 1988, il fratello maggiore di un amico mi fece una cassetta con Bigger And Deffer di LL Cool J e It Takes A Nation Of Millions dei Public Enemy: quest’ultimo contiene il brano Rebel Without A Pause, che però non capii perché ancora non conoscevo il film con James Dean.
Rebel Without A Cause infatti lo vidi a vent’anni, studiando per un esame di cinema.
Conoscete tutti la storia. James Dean è Jim Stark, un adolescente in conflitto con la famiglia ciecamente conformista; a scuola non fa amicizia e un gruppo di bulli lo prende di mira. Per farsi accettare, Jim si presta a una prova di coraggio estrema, ma il suo rivale muore in un incidente, mentre lui si salva.
A questo punto, credevo di ricordare una scena in cui il regista Nicholas Ray raccontava così l’ennesimo litigio tra Jim Stark e il padre: il ragazzo era di spalle e si rivolgeva a suo padre che però, per tutto il tempo del monologo, restava fuori campo, escluso dall’inquadratura.
Il conflitto tra due generazioni era espresso con una figura semplice, tanto chiara quanto intensa: una scelta formale così potente, applicata a un tema simile, a vent’anni non poteva non restarmi impressa.
La settimana scorsa ho guardato Rebel Without A Cause due volte proprio per ritrovare quella scena, ma non ci sono riuscito.
Mi sono ripromesso di guardarlo una terza volta, ma sospetto che la scena che vi ho descritto sia un prodotto della mia memoria. Che avrebbe cioè selezionato e ricombinato elementi del film con altri materiali presenti nel mio bagaglio culturale, dando vita a una sintesi del tutto personale, significativa per me: una copia, una versione a uso e consumo della mia privata esperienza.
Mi sono ritrovato di nuovo a pensare che la principale caratteristica che la nostra società richiede a ogni prodotto culturale è che sia modificabile liberamente da parte di chi lo riceve. Nel mercato delle idee una divisione delle arti non è più necessaria, il concetto di genere sparisce nel magma di una cultura popolare che assimila ogni tipo di espressione e la restituisce sotto forma di bene di consumo: il prodotto si identifica completamente con l’atto culturale, cioè l’esperienza della sua fruizione dal vero, e si presenta come un fenomeno umano inedito che è, nello stesso tempo, intrattenimento edonisticamente inteso, scelta consapevole dell’identità e specchio dei mille volti del vivere sociale, che la cultura così giustifica e legittima nelle sue forme fisse.
Dal pessimismo sofisticato di Larry David alla psichedelia illetterata di un rapper tipo Lil B, un’infinita abbondanza di modelli, estremamente vari ma tutti ugualmente duttili, prende posto accanto alla nostra immagine reale: la tensione che ne deriva finisce per definire prima il nostro comportamento, poi il nostro essere profondo, secondo un processo di costruzione dell’identità individuale che l’abitudine alla tecnologia ha reso inesorabile perché del tutto automatico e spontaneo.
Questi nostri beniamini per funzionare devono essere veri. Ma dove finisce il Larry David reale e dove comincia il suo personaggio? In Curb Your Enthusiasm David interpreta se stesso e molti attori famosi appaiono nella serie in quanto suoi amici nella vita vera.
Se non ci fosse questa tensione, cioè se a tratti la finzione stessa non ci desse elementi volti a farci supporre che non è finzione, ma realtà, quella che stiamo guardando, il meccanismo scatterebbe con più difficoltà: la confusione tra il David vero e quello della finzione, infatti, replica la confusione che ognuno di noi vive nella tensione quotidiana tra la propria realtà vissuta e i modelli immaginari che vi si sovrappongono.
In questa ottica, allora, anche la fortuna di figure che hanno romanticamente perseguito l’identità di arte e vita potrebbe essere dovuta alla mutazione in una dinamica della percezione e non a un movimento della mentalità o a un cambiamento di prospettiva nella cultura dominante.
Anche la fortuna di chi, come James Dean, ha finito per diventare un’icona suo malgrado.
La sua morte in un incidente automobilistico avviene meno di un mese prima del lancio di Rebel Without A Cause ed è l’evento tragicamente spettacolare che aggiunge a ogni interpretazione di James Dean uno spessore mitologico che prescinde dal suo talento di attore. È il 1955.
La morte, nella definizione fulminante di Pier Paolo Pasolini, conclude una biografia dandole senso, come il montaggio finale di un film.
Nello studio svolto da Pasolini sul linguaggio cinematografico hanno un ruolo fondamentale le riflessioni sul film di Abraham Zapruder, in cui è ripreso in diretta l’assassinio di JFK.
Ma nel 1955 il senatore degli Stati Uniti John Fitzgerald Kennedy si sta sottoponendo a un ciclo di operazioni alla colonna vertebrale: rischierà di morire, riceverà addirittura l’estrema unzione, ma si rimetterà, vincerà le elezioni e, nel 1963, sarà puntuale a Dallas per permettere a un sarto ebreo di girare la pellicola amatoriale più importante della storia del cinema.
Il film di Zapruder infatti, oltre a influenzare per sempre la rappresentazione della violenza nel cinema non solo americano, svelerà in modo letteralmente esplosivo le potenzialità del film non professionale, ponendo al centro del dibattito il rapporto tra realtà e rappresentazione filmica. È certo a causa di un processo innescato dal film di Zapruder se, oltre venticinque anni dopo, dalla giungla delle Filippine, Francis Ford Coppola arriverà a profetizzare che l’estetica del cinema futuro sarà decisa dagli amatori.
Se non sono riuscito a ritrovare la scena che cercavo, in Rebel Without A Cause ho però trovato un’altra sequenza che mi è sembrata, in questo senso, molto preziosa.
Prima del finale tragico, James Dean si nasconde in una villa abbandonata. Con lui c’è Judy, la ragazza che ama, interpretata da Natalie Wood, e Plato, Sal Mineo, ragazzo difficile che lo mitizza e lo considera un eroe. Il personaggio di Plato, il primo adolescente più o meno esplicitamente gay mai apparso al cinema, è quello che farà precipitare la situazione con la propria autodistruttività: ma quando i tre arrivano alla villa, è proprio a Plato che si deve la costituzione di un momentaneo e impossibile nucleo familiare deviato.
Plato si addormenta e i due innamorati lo guardano dormire: allora si accorgono che ha i calzini spaiati, uno rosso e uno blu.
L’inquadratura scelta da Nicholas Ray ci fa vedere Plato disteso con i calzini in vista, con accanto la coppia che lo veglia. È una specie di natività, una prima scena.
James Dean e Natalie Wood sono toccati nel profondo dalla sbadataggine del loro bambino ideale dal momento che essa rappresenta di per sé il disconoscimento di tutto un sistema di valori. L’errore diventa così un segno di riconoscimento, una dichiarazione di identità, un linguaggio, e può assumere valore estetico.
Anche i vestiti di James Dean infatti sono rossi e blu e sembrano riprendere i colori dei calzini di Plato lungo due diagonali che si incrociano armonicamente.
In altre parole, l’atteggiamento sociale di Plato è così immediatamente decodificato e condiviso dai suoi amici che il suo sbagliare i calzini appare come la sintesi di una visione della vita, un segno di stile, che capiscono e addirittura trovano bello.
All’alba del rock’n’roll, in Rebel Without A Cause potrebbe già essere presente un comportamento estetico che prefigura la profezia di Francis Ford Coppola, perlomeno in senso poetico.
Per tutta la vita Nick Ray apparirà in pubblico in camicia rossa, come per citare il costume del suo eroe. E sarà in camicia rossa in quasi tutte le scene di Lightning Over Water, opera disturbante e controversa di Wim Wenders sui suoi ultimi giorni di vita. Cinema e realtà, vita e morte: nella visione di Ray malato terminale gli opposti sono complementari e la fine dà il senso al principio.
Ma non c’è bisogno di aver vissuto la leggenda in prima persona perché il cinema vi sia entrato nelle ossa.
Come teorizza sempre Pasolini negli scritti raccolti in Empirismo eretico, gli strumenti di cui ci serviamo per leggere un’immagine cinematografica sono gli stessi che utilizziamo per decodificare un brano di realtà: ne sono coinvolti i nostri sensi e la narrativa stessa del racconto filmico replica la struttura del sogno e del ricordo, procedendo per figure sintetiche.
Quanta della nostra memoria dobbiamo alla vita vissuta e quanta invece alle esperienze riprodotte che arrivano dal flusso infinito dell’audiovisivo?
I calzini di Sal Mineo in Rebel Without A Cause sono forse il primo ingenuo manifesto di un’epoca che ha cercato sempre più nella libertà astratta dell’arte di sublimare il vuoto lasciato dalle grandi ipotesi di trasformazione sociale.
Così quel 1955 in cui muore James Dean è anche l’anno al quale torna dal futuro Michael J. Fox con la sua Delorean: e in Back To The Future la funzione comica è tutta affidata alle icone e la grandezza del capitalismo americano è celebrata con l’identificazione totale di esso con la sua dimensione immaginaria.
La natura stessa della nostra memoria sembra mutare a contatto con le esperienze riprodotte, che si mimetizzano tra i ricordi reali contribuendo a formare il sapere che è alla base della nostra identità. Perciò siamo vulnerabili davanti allo schermo, touchables: perché guardare un film, più che un divertimento, per noi è un’operazione sentimentale.

(continua)

(01/6)