BODY BUILDERS

words by walter siti, images by sterling ruby

EXERCISES IN COHERENCE

Word of mouth takes him to Turin, where there’s an international-standard body-builder who doesn't have sex, but “he lets you lick him and he gives beatings.” Danilo follows orders, incites whippings, kisses the callouses on the man’s heels and spurs his mind on to the desire to be penetrated by absurd volumes – but his mind doesn’t respond, doesn’t take off. The master has wrinkles around his mouth, he has the buttocks of a gorilla and a thick, farmer's neck; as he walks back to Porta Nuova, with the sun already filed away at the bottom of the Umbertine avenues, an extremely clear and commanding voice whispers to him “you’ve gone the wrong way, this isn’t your story.”

The human body can be viewed in many different ways, but when it comes to bodybuilding the parameters tighten. In his writings, Walter Siti has repeatedly pointed out the sexual, compulsive attraction of these carefully deformed bodies. He has also highlighted their contradictions, portraying them as attractive, deviant bodies, bearers of a symbolic value, products of a society obsessed with images. sterling ruby’s interest in the built body – as evidenced by the collage series physicalism / the recombine – lies instead on a more iconographic, sculptural level. Nonetheless, there seems to be a repressed violence in his subjects that escapes the plastic materiality of the muscles. He also juxtaposes the human figures with inanimate and vaguely anthropomorphic objects that, while assuming corporeal features, also modify the bodies, cover their faces, dehumanize them. We decided here to place several fragments from walter siti’s autopsia dell’ossessione alongside Sterling Ruby’s collage series. the result, as we imagined, goes further than the mere sum of the parts.

*
No, Angelo isn’t the wretch that he looks like in the suburbs: he has the androgynous majesty of a great showgirl. When he cracks jokes about his slipping wig or falls in his heels; when he turns his tight waist toward the rogue tying him up and dominates him with an imperceptible consent of the hips. He can’t have acquired that kind of class in San Basilio; if Danilo needed any further proof that there is no point where the heaven of glory and the earth of the economy touch, it would be enough to watch Angelo show a newcomer his duties (it’s not for nothing that the swingers club where he picks them up is called Olympus). Supreme MC and cup-bearer, thanks to a charisma he himself is unaware of. All eyes turn unwittingly on him; the philosophical consideration he gives to any objective is that of Endymion kissed by the Moon. Who cares if he says “‘ere y’are,” or if he shouts “hiya” on the telephone (dialect for “here it is” or a crippling of “hello”?). The life of his dialectal body is something else, only a dim realist would mistake it for his essential being.

*
A white steel, interior design world, with shining marble floors: a fair approximation of the other Olympus – a sequence of distances where Angelo’s body forgets (actually, has never known) the drug addicts’ dribble and jokes in Roman slang. By way of a play of shadows that cut like a scalpel, he looks like he’s dressed in opaque thigh-high tights – as if his empyrean transformation had brought with it an ardent femininity. His foot is raised like Galatea skimming the foam of the sea (an enchanted and glassy sea) and he has a strip of white light on his bicep: a mark of his confirmation, the stamp of a delivery with no return receipt.

*
He goes for a swim in the Secchia with his friends: he is enrolled to do Philosophy but doesn’t go to classes – he passed two exams, easily, because philosophy is something he lives. Because of the arguments it puts forth, he has no desire to translate the book: if the world of production is eroticized, why should he condemn himself prematurely to being a bookworm? He justified this by telling himself “I am a hundred-meter sprinter, not a marathon runner” (in reality sports – athletics, cycling, skating – had always been things he’d watched but not taken part in). He signs up at the gym to strengthen his physique and see a few muscles when he looks into the mirror: “if I became like them, I might be less desperate.” The lion tamer from Juliet of the Spirits, a bodybuilder called Torrisi, catches fire on his pillow every night; go and find him, find out where he lives.

*
Danilo still doesn’t know anything about anabolic steroids and testosterone enhancers, but Klossowski writes that “those who want the object, want the tool.” Maybe the book is too adult for him, it assumes too much experience; he on the other hand is convinced that if he refuses to translate it that’s because it’s reactionary, because it confuses the tiredness of the workers with the Sadean elaboration of fantasy (phantasme, not fantôme). Danilo doesn’t lack intelligence but the strength to apply it; he has already given up on the storms of competition, on the servilities that eat away at your insides, on tiring steps – insist, but also don’t: and anyway not here, in this asphyxiating environment made of earth as deep and heavy as a lasagna.
Danilo wants to respect the seven basic positions that correspond to the seven levels of submission, but Angelo is often too tired to go along with it (“let’s run through it again tonight, come on”) – he doesn’t spend as long looking at himself in the mirror, he turns down meetings with fans (“I’ve hung my cock back up… remember, right, I only need a small hook …”). Danilo realizes that Angelo’s new relative ugliness could work (provisionally) like the volcanic eruptions that force people to migrate, giving life to new civilizations. “Basically,” he thinks, “all that interests me is to humiliate God through his messengers.” Which, according to the literal truth of the Bible, was Sodom’s real sin. For the last few months in Rome, the must-see has been Bo Dixon, a sesquipedalian bodybuilder and militant gay activist: too sure of himself, too much of a public icon and equestrian monument. Danilo doesn’t even try to go near him: better a flawed Angelo than a blazing star. He already knows his role by heart, he’s become one with the character – stars have a first name and a last name, and who knows what it would take to un-Christen them. When a body qualifies itself as principal actor on the stage of obsession, does the investiture never end? Does it ever stop producing angst?

*
It was during the carefree parenthesis of 2006, when in a burst of aspiring youthfulness and with a crazy sack-full of anabolic steroids Angelo returned (at the age of 37) to high-level competition – until an accident killed the attempt at birth. He was gifted with a suppleness that stank of black magic; he put together a physique worthy of the war of the worlds, two amphibian thighs standing between the rebels and the Empire’s luminous spaceship; this time he was the one who wanted the chains; the paint drips were the creative stamp (so to speak) of the photographer, intent on emphasizing the whole monumental set-up.

*
His chest muscles were like sumptuous vegetables in an agricultural fair, prize-winning pumpkins or oblong watermelons; or, in a chalky version, the ones that adorn the cornucopias of Renaissance and Baroque decorations. Nature’s three kingdoms – animal, vegetable, and mineral – competing on a black background to prepare the evaporation of the intellect: his head almost inexistent, sucked into a vortex, a filament left over in the passage from one dimension to another. But Danilo sees different echoes in the image, invocations at the limits of endurance: this is the stone that the sacrificial blood drips from, the tombstone, the granite phallus that the priests circle; they are the powerful breasts of the mother goddess, the cry of a monstrous and forever enslaved fertility.

*
Called back to order and to the awareness of what he came there to do, Danilo collects himself and returns to the torture chamber, which is much more crowded now – all the equipment is working but he is immediately drawn to the Saint Andrew’s Cross, tied to which is a body-builder with his arms and legs splayed apart. His back is turned and he is wearing only crossed leather braces and a pair of black leather chaps, those trousers that have a circular opening that leaves the buttocks exposed. His buttocks are already lined with red marks from the whip, which gives Danilo’s fantasy full reign – a frenzy to possess and to swallow at once, like the bowels of an invincible monster coming out and devouring the princess with no hope of escape. He is irresistibly drawn to it, like a spaceship that has gone too close to a planet’s gravitational field.
You don’t go against the laws of physics: his hands are now navigating half a meter away from the glowing object and (spurred on by right of cosmic necessity) brave the cracks of the whip – the master looks like a big paintbrush with a horsey face and hair that is more worn out than grizzled. A neutral gaze that neither invites nor denies: the body-builder’s invisible mouth gives out a lustier moan, he arches his back. This is the sign, Danilo gets up his courage and places his open palms on the reddened ass. A silence from the celestial realms lasts perhaps a second or perhaps a thousand years: the body-builder turns around, mystical and remote – the master tears away Danilo’s arm, rudely rejecting him: “das war völlig unpassend und sehr unhöflich.

*
He found an internet site called Bound Gods; he signed up by credit card and now he can admire muscular Americans being tortured in iron cages, decked out in harnesses and sodomized by machines. At the end they smile and hug, even if they first shocked each other with electric whips – sparks flying off upon contact with skin, and arched backs. To purify himself, he alternates it with digital museum catalogues whose enlargements prompt a convulsive attention to detail: the skirting board in Vermeer’s Young Woman Sat at a Virginal, small blue hand-drawn ceramic tiles running along the wall (you can make out a warrior with a long lance and a peasant working with a hoe); the convex mirror behind Van Eyck’s Arnolfinis is mounted in a ten-tooth frame – in the eighth one, counting clockwise, you can see a medallion of Christ at the column. Actual pornography, biological and three-dimensional, is more disappointing than pornography on video: the new generation of bodybuilders are disgusting – genetically modified, their tiny heads on disproportionate and spongy bodies that look like Japanese Manga.


All images: Sterling Ruby, Physicalism / The Recombine, 2006, courtesy the artist.


Walter Siti (1947) is a novelist, essayist and literary critic based in Rome. His novels include Scuola di nudo, Troppi paradisi and Il contagio, and he is also the editor of the Mondadori edition of the Complete Works of Pier Paolo Pasolini. His most recent novel, Resistere non serve a niente, has just been published by Rizzoli. He is considered one of the most original writers currently working in Italy.

Sterling Ruby (1972) lives and works in Los Angeles. He is widely viewed as one of the most influential visual artists to emerge in the last decade. His artistic practice crosses over a range of media, including painting, sculpture, collage, photography, ceramics, clothing and interior design.




Il corpo umano può essere visto in tanti modi, ma quando si parla di culturismo il cerchio si stringe. Nei suoi scritti, Walter Siti ha più volte fatto riferimento ad un’attrazione sessuale, compulsiva nei confronti di questi fisici attentamente deformati. Ne ha anche messo in luce la contraddizione quasi poetica, ritraendoli come corpi attraenti, deviati, portatori di un simbolo, prodotti di una società con l’ossessione per l’immagine. L’interesse artistico di Sterling Ruby nei confronti del corpo costruito – come testimonia la serie di collages intitolati Physicalism / The Recombine – è invece più sul piano iconografico, scultoreo. Tuttavia, nei suoi soggetti sembra esserci una violenza repressa che sfugge alla materialità plastica dei muscoli. Inoltre c’è l’accostamento ripetuto di oggetti inanimati vagamente antropomorfi che, pur assumendo fattezze corporee, modificano al tempo stesso i soggetti, ne coprono i volti, li deumanizzano. Abbiamo deciso di accostare alcuni frammenti tratti dal romanzo Autopsia dell’Ossessione di Walter Siti con la serie di collages di Sterling Ruby e il risultato va, come immaginavamo, oltre la somma delle parti.

*
Col passaparola arriva a Torino, dove è segnalato un body-builder di livello internazionale che però non fa sesso, «si fa leccare e mena». Danilo esegue, invoca le frustate, bacia la callosità dei calcagni e incita la propria mente a voler essere penetrata da volumi assurdi – ma la mente non risponde, non decolla. Il master ha le rughe ai lati della bocca, i glutei da gorilla e una collottola spessa da contadino; tornando verso porta Nuova, col sole già archiviato in fondo ai viali umbertini, una voce nettissima e inoppugnabile gli bisbiglia “hai sbagliato strada, questa non è la tua storia”.

*
No, Angelo non è il miserabile che appare quando sta in borgata: ha la regalità androgina della grande soubrette. Quando scherza sulla parrucca che gli scivola o quando cade dai tacchi; quando con la vita stretta si volge al manigoldo che lo sta legando e lo domina con un impercettibile assenso del bacino. La classe non può averla imparata a San Basilio; se Danilo avesse bisogno di una prova ulteriore che il cielo della gloria e la terra dell’economia non hanno punti di tangenza, gli basterebbe osservare Angelo mentre illustra a un nuovo adepto quali sono i suoi compiti (non per nulla il locale di scambisti dove li va a cercare si chiama Olimpo). Cerimoniere e coppiere supremo, per un carisma sconosciuto anche a se stesso. Tutti gli sguardi inconsapevolmente si volgono a lui; la pensosità filosofica che regala all’obbiettivo è quella di Endimione baciato dalla luna. Che importa se dice “andove”, o se grida “èllo” al telefono (abbreviazione dialettale di “eccolo” o storpiamento di “hallo”?). Quella del suo corpo dialettale è un’altra vita, che soltanto degli ottusi veristi possono confondere con l’essenziale.
Un mondo bianco e acciaio da interior design, coi pavimenti specchianti di marmo: discreta approssimazione dell’altro Olimpo – un’infilata di lontananze in cui il corpo di Angelo dimentica (anzi, non ha mai conosciuto) le bave dei drogati e le battute in romanaccio. Per un gioco di ombre taglienti come un bisturi, sembra che indossi autoreggenti velate – come se la trasmutazione empirea avesse comportato un intervento di assorta femminilità. Il piede alzato come Galatea che sfiora la spuma del mare (mare incantato e vitreo) e un nastro di luce bianca sul bicipite: marchio di una cresima, timbro di spedizione senza ricevuta di ritorno.

*
Va a fare il bagno nel Secchia con gli amici: si è iscritto a Filosofia ma non frequenta – due esami li ha superati, e bene, perché la filosofia la vive. Quel libro, proprio per gli argomenti che sostiene, lo proietta fuori dal desiderio di tradurlo: se il mondo della produzione è erotizzato, perché condannarsi precocemente a fare il topo di biblioteca? “Sono un centometrista” si giustifica, “non una maratoneta” (in realtà gli sport, l’atletica il ciclismo il pattinaggio, li ha sempre spiati ma praticati mai). Si iscrive in palestra per consolidare il fisico e vedere un po’ di muscoli allo specchio: “se diventassi come loro, forse la mia smania si calmerebbe”. Il domatore di Giulietta degli spiriti, un culturista di nome Torrisi, gli prende fuoco sul cuscino tutte le notti; andarlo a trovare, informarsi dove abita. Danilo non sa ancora nulla di anabolizzanti e testosteronici, ma Klossowski scrive che “chi vuole l’oggetto, vuole lo strumento”. Forse quel libro è troppo adulto per lui, presuppone troppa esperienza; lui invece si convince che se rifiuta di tradurlo è perché si tratta di un libro reazionario, che confonde la fatica dei lavoratori con l’elaborazione sadiana del fantasma (“phantasme”, non “fantôme”). A Danilo non manca l’intelligenza ma la forza per applicarla; già rinuncia alle tempeste della competizione, ai servilismi che corrodono il fegato, ai gradini faticosi – insistere, ma anche no: e comunque non qui, in questo ambiente asfittico di terra bassa e pesante come una lasagna.

*
Danilo vorrebbe rispettare le sette posizioni fondamentali che corrispondono ai sette livelli di sottomissione, ma spesso Angelo è troppo stanco per assecondarlo («stasera famo un riassunto, dài») – non si osserva più così a lungo negli specchi, rifiuta gli appuntamenti con le fan («ho appeso l’uccello al chiodo… to’ o ricordi eh, basta un chiodino piccolo…»). A Danilo viene in mente che la nuova relativa bruttezza di Angelo potrebbe funzionare (provvidenzialmente) come certe eruzioni vulcaniche che costringono i popoli a migrare dando origine ad altre civiltà. “In fondo” pensa “la sola cosa che mi attrae è umiliare Dio nei suoi messaggeri”. Che è poi, stando alla lettera biblica, il vero peccato di Sodoma. Il must di questi mesi, a Roma, è Bo Dixon, sesquipedale culturista e militante gay: troppo sicuro di sé, troppo icona pubblica e monumento equestre. Danilo non ci prova nemmeno ad avvicinarlo: meglio Angelo difettoso che i divi sfolgoranti. Lui ormai sa la parte a memoria, si è fuso nel personaggio – i divi hanno un nome e un cognome, ci vorrebbe chissà quanto per sbattezzarli. Quando un corpo si qualifica come attore centrale del teatro ossessivo, l’investitura non finisce mai? Non dimissiona mai dal procurare angoscia?

*
Fu durante la spensierata parentesi del 2006, quando in uno scatto di giovanilismo e con una bisaccia scriteriata di anabolizzanti Angelo si era rimesso in pista (a trentasette anni) per competizioni di alto livello – fin che un incidente aveva troncato l’avventura sul nascere. Dotato di una plasticità che puzzava di magia nera; s’era combinato un fisico da guerra dei mondi, due cosce anfibie tra i ribelli e l’astronave luminosa dell’Impero; le catene stavolta le aveva volute lui, le scolature di vernice erano la firma creativa (diciamo così) del fotografo, impegnato a sottolineare l’impianto monumentale dell’insieme.
I muscoli del petto come vegetali fastosi da fiera agricola, zucche da premio o cocomeri oblunghi; oppure, in versione gessosa, quelli che adornano le cornucopie delle decorazioni rinascimentali e barocche. I tre regni della natura, animale vegetale e minerale, concorrenti sul fondo nero a preparare l’evaporazione dell’intelletto: la testa quasi inesistente perché risucchiata da un vortice, filamento residuo nel passaggio da una dimensione all’altra. Ma Danilo legge nell’immagine altri echi, invocazioni al limite della sopportabilità: questa è la pietra da cui cola il sangue dei sacrifici, il cippo funebre, il fallo di granito intorno a cui girano i sacerdoti; sono le mammelle possenti della dea madre, l’urlo di una fertilità mostruosa e schiavizzata per sempre.

*
Richiamato all’ordine e alla consapevolezza di quel che è venuto a fare lì, Danilo si riscuote e torna nella sala dei supplizi, che ora è molto più affollata – tutti gli attrezzi sono in funzione ma lui è calamitato subito dalla croce di sant’Andrea, dove a braccia e gambe divaricate sta legato un culturista. E’ girato di spalle, vestito soltanto di bretelle di cuoio incrociate e di un paio di chaps di pelle nera, quei pantaloni con un’apertura circolare che lascia scoperti i glutei. Glutei già rigati da solchi rossi di frusta, su cui si scatena la fantasia di Danilo – una frenesia di possedere e di inghiottire insieme, come se le viscere si estroflettessero in un mostro contro il quale non c’è misura e la principessa è divorata senza scampo. Un’attrazione che lo cattura irresistibilmente, come un’astronave che si sia avvicinata troppo al campo gravitazionale di un pianeta.
Non ci si oppone alle leggi della fisica: le sue mani navigano ormai a mezzo metro dall’oggetto radiante e (forti di un diritto che è necessità cosmica) sfidano le frustate – il master è un pennellone dal viso cavallino e dai capelli più esausti che brizzolati. Uno sguardo neutro, che non invita e non nega: dalla bocca invisibile del body-builder esce un gemito più voglioso, le reni si inarcano. E’ il segnale, Danilo si fa coraggio e impone le sue palme aperte sul culo arrossato. Un silenzio delle sfere celesti che forse dura un secondo o forse mille anni: il culturista si è girato, mistico e remoto – il master strappa via il braccio di Danilo, lo rifiuta sgarbatamente: «das war völlig unpassend und sehr unhöflich»

*
Ha scovato un sito internet che si chiama Bound Gods; si è iscritto con la carta di credito e ora può ammirare americani muscolosi torturati dentro gabbie di ferro, addobbati di finimenti e inculati a macchina. Sorridono alla fine tenendosi abbracciati, anche se prima si sono sottoposti reciprocamente a scosse elettriche con frustini terminanti in una piastra – scintille al contatto con la pelle e reni inarcate. Per purificarsi li alterna coi cataloghi digitali dei musei, dove gli ingrandimenti consentono un’attenzione spasmodica ai particolari: nella Donna seduta al virginale di Vermeer, lo zoccolo di piccole ceramiche azzurre a disegni che corre lungo la parete (si riconoscono un guerriero dalla lunga lancia e un contadino che zappa); lo specchio convesso alle spalle dei Coniugi Arnolfini di Van Eyck è racchiuso in una cornice a dieci denti – nell’ottavo, contando in senso orario, si distingue un medaglione con Cristo alla colonna. La pornografia realizzata, tridimensionale e biologica, è più deludente di quella in video: i culturisti di nuova generazione sono disgustosi – geneticamente modificati, testa piccolissima su un corpo sproporzionato e spugnoso come quello dei manga giapponesi.


Walter Siti (1947) è uno scrittore, saggista e critico letterario che vive a Roma. Ha curato le opere complete di Pier Paolo Pasolini. Tra i suoi libri Scuola di nudo, Troppi paradisi, Il contagio. Per Rizzoli ha appena pubblicato il nuovo romanzo Resistere non serve a niente. E’ considerato uno dei più originali scrittori del panorama letterario italiano.

Sterling Ruby (1972) vive e lavora a Los Angeles. E’ considerato uno dei più influenti artisti emersi negli ultimi dieci anni. Sviluppa la sua pratica artistica attraverso diversi tipi di media: pittura, scultura, collage, fotografia, ceramica, vestiti e interior design.

(01/7)