TROFEO VIVO, TROFEO MORTO

by Patrizio Di Massimo

HERE BEFORE

As we did with Luca Trevisani, who wrote about Francesco Lo Savio, and with Luca Vitone about Emilio Prini, we asked Patrizio di Massimo, a young italian artist who lives between London and Amsterdam, to write a text about an artist of a previous generation, specifically the beloved Pino Pascali. Patrizio already made a piece about him, Pelo & Contropelo, and Pascali’s work will be the starting point for his upcoming show in Naples. As usual, we didn’t ask him for a historical piece, but for the tale of his personal relationship with this artist. To Pino With Love, Patrizio.



The first time I came across Pino Pascali I was sixteen years old. It was during a Sunday outing at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Rome – one of the few places where his works are on display. I saw Primo piano di labbra [Red Lips] and Dinosauro che riposa [Sleeping Dinosaur]. From that moment on, to me Pascali was the power of image, impetus, his own absurd tragedy.

Many artists of my generation live in the edification of a recent past. This indicates an awareness that a radical discourse on the language of art is not necessarily the moments of history. It’s like treating our “fathers” like trophies, reifying memory. Hung up on the wall, we observe them. I don’t think this attitude is nostalgic because I believe that a work about an artist of the past necessarily implicates research into and the comprehension of the space which that artist occupies in the present. This spirit of the times seems to be quite evident, and in a recent article published in Frieze, Jan Verwoert writes: “this is not supposed to sound too morbid – but the generation that opened up crucial possibilities for the present in the 1960s and ’70s is about to reach a critical age. Some of its members are already dead. How are we going to express our indebtedness to them? More artists’ estates will come into circulation, or are already doing so. Who is going to take care of them, and how?” 

I would like to talk about Pascali beginning at the end: when, a few months before his death, the 34th edition of the Venice Biennale opened and many of the participating artists were protesting and closing the galleries where their works were on display to the public. It was 1968; the world was in upheaval because of the student revolts, begun as a protest to the Vietnam War first in the United States and then later arriving in Europe. Dissent had taken hold also in Italy and there had been violent conflicts between the police and architecture students of Valle Giulia (seat of the architecture department of the University of Rome) a few days before the opening of the Biennale. The Fine Arts Academy in Venice was occupied and discontent had instilled a duty to protest among the artists of the Biennale. Led by Emilio Vedova and Luigi Nono, they demonstrated in the city. They were contesting the context. Fabio Sargentini, who I met while shooting my documentary Pelo & Contropelo, relates that Pascali responded to the request to close his exhibition room with these words: “If they don’t let me show my works I’m going to smash their heads in!”

In the months prior to the opening of the Biennale, Pascali had worked on his new works intensely, day and night, and didn’t want to have to censure them. For this reason he spoke in Saint Mark’s Square, in front of hundreds of protesting students, in order to explain his “dissent from the dissent”. His position was clear: these displayed objects had an intrinsic political value more potent than any closed door. Pascali had faith in his works and didn’t want the “politically” to kill the “being political by nature” of his work. He declared an awareness that every “ends to” is nothing more than an easy publicity trap that periodically repeats itself, at the service of one philosophy or another, of one mind or another. But in the end he, too, closed his exhibition room – perhaps he didn’t want to become one of those trophies hung on the wall, similar to his sculptures.

It seems to me, however, that Pascali’s consideration of his works as agents of social transformation had always been present. Immediately after leaving the Fine Arts Academy in Rome, he began working as a set designer and publicist for “Lodolo Film” and for RAI, the Italian national public television. He created, among other things, the subscription campaign for RAI Radiotelefortuna with a series of new drawings entitled Africa. The images are of a clear colonial inspiration: Gorilla, Aborigine, Rhinoceros, Lion, Witch-doctor, Whale, Crocodile, Masks, Leopard with Prey, Tanned Skin, Shark. With these drawings, Pascali showed on TV images belonging to a forgotten Italian history: the African colonization, that place in the sun so longed for, its beasts and exoticisms. It was the black continent that entered into every Italian home, the journey to the other that bared all and penetrated to inside an unwittingly post-colonial society that was currently living its economic boom. Boom!

This becomes even more interesting and evident if we think about dates: Pino was born in 1935, the exact year in which Mussolini invaded Ethiopia and so provided a beginning to the preparations towards World War II. All Pascali is a little like this: the projection of his childhood onto his works. We can, in fact, read his weapon series in this way – the game of the artist growing up during the war – and so too for the “fake sculptures” and trophies – metaphors of a conquest to hold up, a past to bring back, a future to invent. The trophies are risks, misadventures, cruelties, and also the three-dimensional transposition of the drawings inspired by Africa. Alive, the animals that had inspired the Radiotelefortuna campaign became war relics and colonial reliquaries of a battle won with difficulty. In actuality, they transformed into semi-abstractions because their forms were now evocative. Rhinoceros or dragon? Giraffe or phoenix? Face or ass? Pascali becomes the metaphor of the hunter of archetypal and mysterious images. In this series he never fully abandons himself to the use of a simple material used in its purity; there is always something stagy in the way in which these works take on the characteristics of an intrinsic reality. These objects, having been constructed with shaped canvases, make their construction process the load-bearing spirit of the work. They declare themselves sculptures but they are empty inside and unexpectedly light. One of them is the most tautologically successful: it’s entitled Decapitazione della scultura [The decapitation of sculpture] and is the decapitation of the medium itself because it’s constructed with materials antithetical to those of sculpture.

During the exhibition Revort 1 in Palermo (1965), Pascali declared: “An Italian artist can not be but an isolated phenomenon in revolt against a phantom situation of a mummified and anti-historical puppet civilization.” There is, in this sentence, the artist that I love. It’s not only the presence of an object to take care of, nor an estate to run, but the human and social drive that becomes aesthetic gesture. It’s the confidence, the faith even, that art can contribute to creating change in the bosom of contemporary Italian society. The works are in revolt, the artist is the platform. It’s difficult today to think that such an attitude and faith can still have value within an embalmed society like the one we’re living in. And it’s not that all artists have to feed their own work with this hope. But we do, in fact, have to face up to the mind of a father like Pascali. A trophy of intentions, dead for some, alive for others. I don’t believe in Manichean explanations, even less so in one-liners that would provide a solution of opinions. Pino taught us the value of the artwork as creature, the only extremely political form of expression. Creature that is neither dissent nor assent, neither silence nor chatter, but the will to be a healthy scandal in the middle of a sad institutional context.

When Pascali died in September 1968, it was felt strongly by everyone in the Italian art world. Alighiero Boetti said: “In 1968 Pascali split his head open with a motorcycle; I split mine on small squares (referring to his works of that period)”. Vittorio Rubiu, perhaps one of the most talented critics of contemporary art in those years, decided to concentrate only on modern art, so strong was his sorrow for the loss of his friend. It was he who told me that in the days preceding Pascali’s death, when he was in hospital, many artists, critics and museum directors went to visit him. For the first time his mother and father understood that their son was somebody important. Tragedies, when they are so absurd, metabolise badly because they are neither good nor evil, neither everything nor nothing, just human thoughts that establish their own limits.


Photo Credits:

1 - Pino Pascali, Decapitazione della scultura, 1966, white canvas on wooden stretchers.

2 - Pino Pascali, Trofeo Bianco, 1966, white canvas on wooden stretchers;

4 - Patrizio Di Massimo in front of Primo piano di labbra and Dinosauro che riposa, 2006, Photo by Riccardo Beretta

5 - Pino Pascali, Pelle Conciata, 1968, acrylic on synthetic blue

6 - Pino Pascali and Alighiero Boetti (sic) - XXXIV Venice Biennale (1968), Photo by Ugo Mulas, published in "Le Arti" n.7/8/9, 1974


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Italian Version
 



Come già abbiamo fatto con Luca Trevisani che ha scritto a proposito di Francesco Lo Savio, e con Luca Vitone che ha scritto su Emilio Prini, abbiamo chiesto a Patrizio di Massimo, giovane artista italiano che vive tra Londra ed Amsterdam, di scrivere un testo su un artista di una generazione precedente, in particolare al compianto Pino Pascali. Patrizio gli ha già dedicato un’opera, Pelo & Contropelo, e il lavoro di Pascali sarà anche il punto di partenza per la sua prossima mostra personale a Napoli. Come sempre abbiamo chiesto che non fosse un articolo di carattere storico, ma il racconto del suo rapporto personale con questo artista. A Pino Con Amore, Patrizio.



La prima volta che incontrai Pino Pascali avevo sedici anni. Fu durante una visita domenicale alla Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna di Roma – uno dei pochi luoghi dove le sue opere sono esposte al pubblico. Vidi
Primo piano di labbra e Dinosauro che riposa. Per me da quel momento Pascali è potenza d’immagine, è impeto, è la sua stessa assurda tragedia.

Molti artisti della mia generazione vivono nell’esaltazione di un passato recente. Questa dinamica indica la consapevolezza che un discorso radicale sul linguaggio dell’arte non è per tutti i momenti della storia. E’ come trattare i nostri “padri” da trofei, reificare la memoria. Appesi al muro li osserviamo. Non penso ci sia nulla di nostalgico in questo atteggiamento perché credo che un lavoro su un artista passato implichi necessariamente la ricerca e la comprensione dello spazio che esso occupa nel presente. Questo spirito dei tempi sembra essere evidente e in un recente articolo pubblicato su Frieze, Jan Verwoert scrive: “
questo non dovrebbe sembrare morboso – ma la generazione che aprì nuove e cruciali possibilità per il presente durante gli anni ‘60 e ‘70 sta per raggiungere un’età critica. Alcuni dei loro protagonisti sono già morti. Come esprimeremo loro il nostro indebitamento?”

Voglio partire dalla fine parlando di Pascali – cioè quando, pochi mesi prima della sua morte, si apriva la trentaquattresima Biennale di Venezia e molti degli artisti protestarono chiudendo le proprie sale espositive al pubblico. Era il 1968, il mondo era in subbuglio per via delle rivolte studentesche iniziate come protesta alla guerra in Vietnam, partite dall’America e arrivate via via in Europa. Anche in Italia il dissenso aveva preso piede e pochi giorni prima dell’inaugurazione della Biennale avvennero i violenti scontri tra celerini e studenti d’architettura di Valle Giulia. A Venezia, l’Accademia di Belle Arti era occupata e il mal contento entrò di petto, creando il dovere di protesta anche tra gli artisti invitati alla Biennale che, capeggiati da Emilio Vedova e Luigi Nono, sfilavano nella città. Contestavano il “con-testo”. Fabio Sargentini, che ho conosciuto durante le riprese del mio documentario
Pelo & Contropelo, racconta che Pascali accolse la richiesta di chiusura della sua sala con queste parole: “Se non mi fanno esporre le mie opere io a questi gli spacco la testa!”

Nei mesi precedenti l’apertura della Biennale Pascali aveva lavorato ai suoi nuovi pezzi intensamente, giorno e notte, e non voleva censurarli. Per questo motivo prese addirittura parola in Piazza San Marco, di fronte a centinaia di studenti in rivolta, per spiegare la ragione del suo “dissenso al dissenso”. Il punto di vista che esprimeva era chiaro: quegli oggetti esposti avevano una valenza politica intrinseca più potente di qualsiasi porta chiusa. Pascali aveva fiducia nei suoi lavori e non voleva che il “politicamente” uccidesse “l’essere politico in natura” della sua opera. Dichiarava la consapevolezza che ogni “fine di” non è che una facile trappola pubblicitaria che periodicamente si ripete, al servizio di una filosofia o di un’altra, di una testa o dell’altra. Alla fine la sua sala la chiuse anche lui – forse non voleva diventare uno di quei trofei appesi al muro simili alle sue sculture.

A mio parere però questo riflesso che Pascali aveva nel considerare le sue opere come agenti di una trasformazione sociale è stato sempre presente. Subito dopo aver finito l’Accademia di Belle Arti a Roma iniziò a lavorare come scenografo e pubblicitario per la “Lodolo Film” e per la RAI – per quest’ultima, tra le altre cose, creò la campagna di abbonamenti RAI Radiotelefortuna con una serie di nuovi disegni intitolata Africa. Sono immagini di chiara inspirazione coloniale.
Gorilla, Aborigeno, Rinoceronte, Leone, Stregoni, Balena, Coccodrillo, Mascheroni, Leopardo con preda, Pelle conciata, Squalo. Pascali in questo modo mostrava attraverso la TV generalista immagini appartenenti ad una storia d’Italia dimenticata: la colonizzazione africana, il posto al sole tanto agognato, le sue bestie e i suoi esotismi. Era il continente nero che entrava in tutte le case degli italiani, il viaggio nell’altro che denudava tutto e penetrava all’interno di una società inconsapevolmente post-coloniale che in quel momento viveva il suo boom economico. B o o m !

Questo diventa ancora più interessante ed evidente se pensiamo alle date: Pino nacque nel 1935, anno esatto in cui Mussolini invase l’Abissinia dando così un inizio alla preparazione verso la Seconda Guerra Mondiale. Tutto Pascali è un po’ così: la proiezione della sua infanzia sulle opere. Possiamo infatti leggere in questo modo le armi finte, il gioco dell’artista che cresceva durante la seconda guerra mondiale e allo stesso modo le finte sculture e quindi i trofei – metafore di una conquista da esibire, passato da riportare, futuro da inventare. I trofei sono rischi, disavventure, spietatezze e allo stesso tempo la trasposizione tridimensionale dei disegni inspirati all’Africa. Da vivi gli animali che avevano inspirato la campagna Radiotelefortuna diventano cimeli di guerra e reliquie coloniali di una battaglia vinta a stenti. Da reali si trasformano in semi-astratti perché le loro forme sono ora evocative. Rinoceronte o drago? Giraffa o fenice? Faccia o culo? Pascali diventa la metafora del cacciatore di immagini archetipe e misteriose. In questa serie non si abbandona mai totalmente all’uso del materiale povero usato nella sua purezza, c’è sempre qualcosa di altamente scenografico in modo che queste opere prendano caratteristiche di irrealtà intrinseca. Questi oggetti, essendo costruiti con tela da pittore centinata, fanno del loro processo costruttivo l’anima portante del lavoro – si dichiarano sculture ma sono vuote all’interno e inaspettatamente leggere. Una di esse è la più tautologicamente riuscita: s’intitola
Decapitazione della scultura ed è una decapitazione del media stesso, perché appunto costruita con materiali antitetici a quelli scultorei.

Durante la mostra
Revort 1 a Palermo (1965), Pascali fa questa dichiarazione: “Un artista italiano non può essere che un fenomeno isolato di rivolta ad una situazione fantasma di una civiltà fantoccio mummificata ed antistorica.” In questa frase c’è l’artista che io amo. Non è solo la presenza di un oggetto da custodire né un’“estate” da gestire ma la pulsione umana e sociale che diventa gesto estetico. E’ la fiducia, addirittura la fede, che l’arte possa contribuire a formare il cambiamento in seno alla società italiana contemporanea. Le opere sono la rivolta, l’artista è la piattaforma. Oggi è difficile pensare che un atteggiamento ed una fiducia simile possano ancora avere valore all’interno di una società imbalsamata come quella che viviamo. E non è detto che tutti gli artisti debbano nutrire il proprio lavoro con questa speranza. Di fatto però dobbiamo confrontarci con la testa di un padre come Pascali. Un trofeo di intenti, morto per alcuni – vivo per altri. Io non credo in manichee spiegazioni, tanto meno in battute che vorrebbero dare soluzione di opinione. Pino secondo me ci ha insegnato il valore dell’opera come creatura, unica forma estremamente politica di espressione. Creatura che non è né dissenso né assenso, né silenzio né vociare ma volontà di essere uno scandalo salutare in mezzo a un mesto contesto istituzionale.

Quando Pascali morì nel settembre del ’68 il colpo fu accusato fortemente da tutto il mondo dell’arte italiana. Alighiero Boetti disse: “
Nel ’68 Pascali si spaccò la testa in moto, io me la spaccai sui quadratini (con riferimento alle sue opere di quegli anni)”. Vittorio Rubiu, forse uno dei più talentati tra i critici di arte contemporanea in quegli anni, decise di occuparsi solo di arte moderna – tanto forte fu il dolore per la perdita dell’amico. Proprio lui mi raccontava che nei giorni precedenti la morte, quando Pino era ricoverato in ospedale, molti artisti, critici e direttori di museo andarono a fargli visita e che per la prima volta il padre e la madre capirono che loro figlio era qualcuno d’importante. Le tragedie, quando sono così assurde, si metabolizzano male perché non sono né bene né male, né tutto né niente, ma umani pensieri che costatano i propri limiti.


Photo Credits:

1 - Pino Pascali, Decapitazione della scultura, 1966, white canvas on wooden stretchers.

2 - Pino Pascali, Trofeo Bianco, 1966, white canvas on wooden stretchers;

4 - Patrizio Di Massimo in front of Primo piano di labbra and Dinosauro che riposa, 2006, Photo by Riccardo Beretta

5 - Pino Pascali, Pelle Conciata, 1968, acrylic on synthetic blue

6 - Pino Pascali and Alighiero Boetti (sic) - XXXIV Venice Biennale (1968), Photo by Ugo Mulas, published in "Le Arti" n.7/8/9, 1974

(01/6)