HEAVEN IS KNOWING WHO YOU ARE

Live voices & street finds by Michele Manfellotto

It lurks

HECTOR, 1977:
STOKE NEWINGTON, 1996

“No, I didn’t know Emilia yet. She knew my friends, not me.
Now we’re inseparable but I still listen to other people’s stories attentively, searching for the Emilia of the years that I missed out on.
In London I just missed her, a thousand times. I’d followed the people who left and squatted houses. It was almost legal, some of them even managed to get rights.
In 1996: the year they killed Tupac, I read it on a plane.
My friends listened to hardcore and dug up their skateboards because it was in. It was a moment of passage: there was always this thing about the underground, only generic, less and less political, mixed up with graphics, and hence the first hip brands, fashion.
Some people knew Emilia, she’d lived there for ages. She was into this stuff, for her job, for her friends.
That’s why everyone was like, Emilia’s pretty, she’s good, she’s talented, she’s cool. Most of all, Emilia’s hot.
She got on my nerves a little. The collective pose, the shared feeling that everything’s more real in London: I felt left out, I hated hearing them talk about it.
I hung around by myself, if I smoked I got paranoid. One time, the friend of one of the girls that lived with us slept in my room: she had the body of a pin-up and teeth like a pony, everyone was hot for her. I’d pigged out at the all-you-can-eat Indian, so I closed myself into my sleeping bag farting, in protest.
The house was in Stoke Newington. It must have been a town house once, or a hotel. There was a huge kitchen, run-down like the other rooms, and the garden, which was a creepy tangle of weeds. Once in a while you’d go there to shit because the bathroom didn’t work, there was no water. The easiest way to take a shower was to go to the public swimming pools.
One time we went to a really big pool, for families, with slides: it was kind of gross, people must have pissed in it.
Two junkies lived in that house before us. We came in thinking it was empty. They came back and saw that we were there: they left, without making a fuss.
John and Paul. We went up to their room: we found two thousand bottles of codeine, empty, all lined up, single file, one next to the other in the middle of the shitshow.
I saw a bag on the floor and I opened it. There was a used fix capped shut and a piece of paper folded in four, a letter for the guy called John.
It was from a friend of his: he’d just had a kid, he wrote about a job they were supposed to give him but they weren’t anymore, about another couple with a baby on the way. These guys were building a bus in their backyard, but it didn’t say what for.
It was a real letter, on paper. Email and all that shit still wasn’t around.
I kept it.


EMILIA, 1967: PETE’S BOOK, 1996

“I’d been with this guy for two years: he played in a band and had crap jobs.
Things were going bad for a while and at a certain point he said, I met a girl.
And that’s it, bye.
We broke up, I felt awful.
I knew this guy Pete at the time. A photographer, the son of this guy that ran a big fashion magazine. A kid: it was ’96 and he must have been twenty, give or take.
He was just starting out, mostly taking photos of people on the street. Interesting types in their natural environment, like, portraits.
This guy works in such and such a place, does this kind of stuff, wears these kind of clothes: kind of in the trend of his father’s magazine, since the very first issue.
I met Pete in a circle of skaters. He wasn’t part of it: he’d wangle his way in, he wanted to take photos of people. This stuff was exploding, the interest in graphics and art connected with skateboarding.
He started calling me, I’d really like to show you my portfolio, hear what you think.
I was trying to work freelance in fashion and three times a week I did the windows for this store: a half-crap deal, but it was fun and made money.
I definitely couldn’t have introduced him to anyone.
In the end I said, OK, show me the portfolio.
Pete shows up with this book full of photos of people, and he’d photographed him too, my boyfriend: the one I’d just broken up with.
I keep on leafing and I get to the photo of this girl. I didn’t know who it was.
Pete points to her and goes, Just think he’s dating her now: she liked his photo and asked me for his number.
She worked in a store too, a lingerie store but a super-fancy one, once in a while she modeled. Pete had photographed her, and he’d photographed him too.
When Pete showed her the photos, she said, He’s cute, who is he?
She got his number, she called him, and they went out.
He was dating her now.
It was to show me the photo that Pete had wanted to see me. If not, then why?
Maybe he felt guilty, wanted to confess. Or he was crazy and liked making people suffer: a power thing. Or he didn’t want to tell me and just happened to spill everything in a moment of embarrassment.
I don’t know, he created it, this thing. You know, I don’t know? Mind your own fucking business.
Right then and there I didn’t think anything. More than what Pete had done, it was the thing in itself that hit me, it seemed absurd.
I thought, Check this girl out, going and calling some guy she doesn’t know just like that, because she likes a photo.”


HECTOR, 1977: GOTHAM AND THE REAL HIP HOP, 2007

“I moved, my room’s still full of boxes. I took the opportunity to throw stuff out: useless stuff, things I don’t want on me anymore.
I found the letter and I showed it to Emilia.
I went back to London, with just her, after more than ten years. Now it looks like Gotham City.
Glass and purple lights, gaping holes in the asphalt in the middle of construction sites, darkness. And the white steam that comes out of the manholes: like in New York, the original Gotham.
Or the gangs of twelve-year olds armed to the teeth, the grime guys running around intimidating and vandalizing without restraint and shooting each other for futile reasons.
It’s this mythological idea of the metropolis: real people imitate it.
That’s why the soundtrack for the new Batman should be done by someone like Shackleton.
On the one from Strange Days there’s Tricky, someone who used to wear make-up and drag and go club-hopping with that fine woman of his.
That movie’s from ’95. Now it’s different: instead of participation there’s this isolation, nothing alive, same as everywhere.
Emilia doesn’t notice this stuff. She’s been in London a lifetime and she’s seen everything: the party with Prince, the butt-naked kung-fu black guy that chased away a squad of cops in riot gear.
On TV she watched this show, a sort of sampling of absurd medical cases.
I saw an episode about this Thai guy who has a colony of gigantic moles spread all over his skin that turn him into a kind of tree-man, like Swamp Thing.
Emilia can’t stop watching this stuff.
Everything was vaguely sunnier when I was there: we watched Heroes and I told her what was copied from X-Men.
Hers is a way of adapting. London can be inhospitable, hard, even going out for groceries can break your heart.
The tough ones all hang out at the pub on the other side of the city, they cross the cold like that. They throw themselves on the couch, in the house they’ve been given by the council. They have a cup of tea, maybe a spliff: and they watch the tree-man.
At the beginning, if I was far away, I’d get melancholic thinking about Emilia home alone with the tree-man. Then I understood that it was practice, a dignified and admirable discipline.
The English tell this crap joke about a guy who goes around with two bunches of parsley stuck in his ears.
A man says to him, Hey, you’ve got parsley in your ears!
And he says, I can’t hear you: I’ve got parsley in my ears.
Emilia can laugh at something like that.
The other day I showed her the letter.
I was thinking about that John who used to get doped up in an abandoned house, in 1996. His friend writing from far away: he had a kid, played the guitar.
Emilia read a bit out loud:
He burst into this world after thirteen excruciating hours of labor, man it was wearing (I think it wore Shelley out a bit too).
Shelley was the mother of this son of theirs, his woman.
Emilia said, He writes like that about his girlfriend: how crass.
When I found the letter I wasn’t much more than a tourist. Emilia was there, like so many, and the letter’s addressee was one of many: John, from who knows where, living.
If you start thinking about these things a city will kill you, that’s why Emilia never does.”


(heavenisknowingwhoyouare.blogspot.com)
Thanks: Emi Maggi, Tijana Mamula.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Italian Version 


HECTOR, 1977:
STOKE NEWINGTON, 1996

“No, ancora non conoscevo Emilia. Lei conosceva i miei amici, non me.
Ora siamo inseparabili ma io ancora ascolto attento i racconti degli altri e cerco Emilia degli anni che mi sono perso.
A Londra non l’ho incontrata per un pelo, mille volte. Ero andato sulla scia di quelli che partivano e occupavano le case. Era quasi legale, certi riuscivano pure a farsi dare il sussidio. Nel 1996: l’anno che hanno ammazzato Tupac, l’ho letto in aereo.
I miei amici ascoltavano hardcore e avevano riesumato lo skate perché andava di moda. Era un momento di passaggio: c’era sempre questa cosa dell’underground, ma generica, sempre meno politica, e insieme anche la grafica, perciò le prime marche fiche, la moda.
Certi conoscevano Emilia, che viveva là da un sacco. Stava in mezzo a queste cose, per il suo lavoro, per gli amici suoi.
Perciò tutti,
Emilia è bella, è buona, è brava, è fica. Soprattutto, Emilia è bona.
Un po’ mi dava ai nervi. La posa collettiva, il sentimento condiviso che a Londra tutto è più reale: mi sentivo tagliato fuori, odiavo che ne parlassero.
Giravo da solo, se fumavo diventavo paranoico. Una volta ha dormito nella mia stanza l’amica di una che stava con noi: aveva un fisico da pin-up e i denti da pony, piaceva un sacco a tutti.
Io, che mi ero sfondato all’indiano
all you can eat, mi sono chiuso nel sacco a pelo a scureggiare, per protesta.
La casa era a Stoke Newington. Doveva essere stata una casa borghese, o un albergo. C’era una cucina enorme, diroccata come le altre stanze e il giardino, che era un groviglio pauroso di erbacce. Ogni tanto ci andavi a cacare perché non funzionava il bagno, l’acqua non c’era.
Il sistema più facile per fare la doccia era andare alle piscine comunali.
Una volta siamo stati in una piscina grossa, per famiglie, con gli scivoli: faceva un po’ schifo, la gente di sicuro ci pisciava dentro.
Prima di noi, in quella casa abitavano due tossici. Siamo entrati pensando che fosse vuota.
Sono tornati e hanno visto che c’eravamo noi: se ne sono andati, senza fare storie.
John e Paul. Siamo saliti in camera loro: abbiamo trovato duemila boccette di codeina, vuote, tutte in fila, in ordine una vicina all’altra in mezzo al merdaio.
Per terra ho visto una valigia e l’ho aperta. C’era una spada usata richiusa col cappuccio e un foglio di carta piegato in quattro, una lettera per quello che si chiamava John.
Era di un amico suo: aveva appena avuto un figlio, parlava di un lavoro che dovevano dargli ma non gli avevano dato più, di un’altra coppia con un bambino in arrivo. Questi costruivano un
bus nel loro giardino, ma non c’era scritto per farci che.
È una lettera vera, di carta. E-mail e cazzi vari ancora erano poco diffusi.
Me la sono tenuta.”


EMILIA, 1967: PETE’S BOOK, 1996

“Stavo con questo tipo da due anni: suonava in una band e faceva lavori del cazzo.
Le cose andavano male da tempo e a un certo punto lui ha detto,
Ho conosciuto una tipa.
E basta, ciao.
Ci siamo lasciati, io sono stata malissimo.
Allora conoscevo questo Pete. Un fotografo, figlio di uno che faceva una rivista di moda grossa. Un pischello: era il ’96 e lui avrà avuto sì e no vent’anni.
Stava cominciando, fotografava soprattutto gente per strada. Tipi interessanti nel loro ambiente naturale, tipo ritratti.
Questo lavora nel tale posto, fa queste cose, si veste così: un po’ il marchio della rivista del padre, dall’inizio.
Ho conosciuto Pete in un giro di skater. Lui non c’entrava: si infilava, voleva fotografare la gente. C’era il boom di queste cose, l’attenzione per la grafica e l’arte legate allo skate.
Ha cominciato a telefonarmi,
Vorrei tanto farti vedere il mio book, sapere che ne pensi.
Io cercavo di lavorare freelance con la moda e tre volte a settimana facevo le vetrine per un negozio: una mezza cacata, ma era divertente e portava soldi.
Di sicuro non potevo presentargli nessuno.
Alla fine gli ho detto,
OK, fammi vedere il book.
Pete è arrivato con questo book pieno di foto di gente e aveva fotografato pure lui, il mio fidanzato: quello con cui mi ero appena lasciata.
Vado avanti a sfogliare e arrivo alla foto di una tipa. Non sapevo chi fosse.
Pete la indica e fa,
Pensa che lui ora esce con lei: a lei è piaciuta la foto di lui e mi ha chiesto il suo numero.
Anche lei lavorava in un negozio, un negozio di biancheria intima ma di super-lusso, ogni tanto faceva la modella. Pete aveva fotografato lei, e aveva fotografato anche lui.
Quando Pete le ha fatto vedere le foto, lei gli ha detto,
Carino lui, chi è?
Si è fatta dare il numero, l’ha chiamato e si sono visti.
Lui stava con quella, adesso.
È per farmi vedere la foto che Pete ha voluto incontrarmi. Perché se no?
Forse si è sentito in colpa, voleva confessare. O era matto e godeva a far stare male gli altri: una cosa di potere. O non voleva dirmelo e gli è scappato di raccontarmi tutto in un momento di imbarazzo.
Non so, l’ha creata lui, questa cosa. Sai che non la so? Fatti i cazzi tuoi.
Lì per lì non ho pensato niente. Più che quello che mi aveva fatto Pete, mi ha fatto impressione la cosa in sé, che mi sembrava assurda.
Dicevo,
Guarda questa che piglia e chiama uno che non conosce così, perché le piace una foto.”


HECTOR, 1977: GOTHAM AND THE REAL HIP HOP, 2007

“Ho traslocato, la mia stanza è ancora piena di scatole. Ho approfittato per buttare: cose inutili, cose che non voglio più con me.
Ho trovato la lettera e l’ho fatta vedere a Emilia.
Sono tornato a Londra solo con lei, dopo più di dieci anni. Ora sembra Gotham City.
Vetro e luci viola, voragini nell’asfalto in mezzo ai cantieri, l’oscurità. E il vapore bianco che esce dai tombini: come a New York, la Gotham originale.
O le gang di dodicenni armati fino ai denti, i tizi grime in giro a delinquere senza ritegno e a spararsi per futili motivi.
È questa idea mitologica della metropoli: le persone vere la copiano.
Perciò la colonna sonora del nuovo Batman dovrebbe farla uno tipo Shackleton.
In quella di
Strange Days c’è Tricky, uno che si truccava e si travestiva e andava per locali con la bella fica della donna sua.
Quel film è del ’95. Adesso è diverso: invece della partecipazione c’è questo isolamento, niente di vivo, come dappertutto.
Emilia non fa caso a queste cose. A Londra è stata una vita e ha visto tutto: la festa con Prince, il negro kung-fu completamente nudo che mette in fuga un plotone di celerini.
Alla tv guardava questo programma, una specie di campionario di casi medici assurdi.
Ho visto una puntata su questo tailandese che ha una colonia di nei giganti che gli dilaga addosso trasformandolo in una specie di uomo-albero, tipo Swamp Thing.
Emilia guarda queste cose e non riesce a smettere.
Tutto era vagamente più solare quando c’ero io: guardavamo
Heroes e io le spiegavo cosa era copiato dagli X-Men.
Il suo è un modo di adattarsi. Londra può essere inospitale, dura, anche uscire a fare la spesa può spezzarti il cuore.
I tipi tosti vanno al pub in comitiva all’altro capo della città, attraversano il gelo così. Si buttano sul divano, nella casa che si sono fatti assegnare dal comune. Si fanno un tè, magari si fanno una bomba: e si sparano l’uomo-albero.
All’inizio, se ero lontano, diventavo malinconico pensando a Emilia sola a casa con l’uomo-albero. Poi ho capito che è un allenamento, una pratica piena di dignità e ammirevole.
Gli inglesi raccontano questa cazzata su uno che gira con due ciuffi di prezzemolo infilati nelle orecchie.
Un altro gli dice,
Ehi, hai del prezzemolo nelle orecchie!
E lui,
Non ti sento: ho del prezzemolo nelle orecchie.
Emilia riesce a ridere di una cosa del genere.
L’altro giorno le ho fatto vedere la lettera.
Pensavo a quel John che si faceva le pere in una casa abbandonata, nel 1996. L’amico suo gli scriveva da lontano: aveva un bambino, suonava la chitarra.
Emilia ha letto un pezzo ad alta voce.
È schizzato in questo mondo dopo tredici ore strazianti di travaglio, amico è stato logorante, (mi sa che la cosa ha logorato un po’ anche Shelley).
Shelley sarebbe la madre di questo loro bambino, la sua donna.
Emilia ha detto,
Scrive così della fidanzata sua: che spirito di patata.
Quando ho trovato la lettera ero poco più di un turista. Emilia era lì, come tanti, e il destinatario della lettera era uno dei tanti: John, di chissà dove, vivente.
Se ti metti a pensare a queste cose una città ti uccide, perciò Emilia non ci pensa mai.”

(heavenisknowingwhoyouare.blogspot.com)
Thanks: Emi Maggi, Tijana Mamula.


(01/2)