HEAVEN IS KNOWING WHO YOU ARE

by Michele Manfellotto

WHAT BECOMES OF THE BROKEN HEARTED?

HECTOR, 1977

1.
“In One, the older son joins a gang and tattoos his face.
They do the initiation: twenty guys beat him up and give him a moko, the traditional Maori tattoo.
The make-up artist for the movie came from a caste of real chiselers.
The Maori used to tattoo their tribal chiefs, embalm their heads when they died. But the English exported those and put them in museums, so they stopped tattooing and just devoted themselves to chiseling.
That’s the tattoo he gets, the moko.
Jake The Muss sees it and says, You look like a painted dick.
That’s in the Italian version. In English he just says, Fuck, you’re too much.
In Two, those same gang members snuff the Painted Dick in a internal feud.
Jake The Muss is screwed up.
They’ve banned him from the Royal Tavern, the pub he always goes to in One, because he beat on everyone. He goes to a different pub but even when he picks fights no one gives a crap.
His kids don’t talk to him and his wife’s hooked up with the social worker.
Afterwards he meets some lumberjacks, big, ignorant but tough. With their help he defeats the gang and makes peace with his living son.
Nothing much, way inferior to One.
The gang leader was tough, he made a slave of the Painted Dick’s woman. Apeman: an aborigine with dreadlocks and tattoos, repulsive. A real two-dimensional bad guy.
The fights, weak.
In One, they lay it out for you right away: right up until the climax with Jake The Muss at the pub, smashing Uncle Bully with broken bottles.
I know cultured types who used to watch it in slow motion, it was that realistic.
In Two the only scene worth salvaging is the cash machine robbery, where they don’t even break it open, they just carry it away on a tow truck.”

EMAIL, EXTRACT (TO HECTOR, 2006)

“Yeah, Julian Casablancas in my dream and I’ve got a crush:
that’s right, I’m thirtysomething
and I have adolescent dreams and get bummed out because they’re not real.
I woke up all chipper
but then all it took was going into the cold office
and never taking my jacket off
to realize that nothing is possible.”


2.
“I save everything. When cell phones came out I copied all the texts I liked into a notebook, so I wouldn’t lose them.
When I read other people’s stuff I feel contorted.
I control my world by overlapping real people with characters.
Of course the characters are gonna be distorted. But pertinent, realistic.
I have a panoply of mythological precedents that I can compare them with to see if they work. If they fit the overall design: the continuity, which I govern.
In kindergarten, for example, this one lady used to show up, a mother. A godawful woman, who I hated, who used to talk with her eyes wide open and fake-smile at everyone.
She had a huge nose and huge teeth, a profile like a shark, so I nicknamed her Mrs. Jabberjaw, like the Hannah-Barbera cartoon.
Or. I worked for these people who used to really oppress me.
The bosses: possessed. After a while a sense of absurdity overcame me and I started imagining them as a bunch of crackpots playing Risk.
It makes sense. Conquering the entirety of America and Asia is like working an unending cycle: it’s pointless.
Without that little game the view of reality is unbearable.
Unfortunately, it doesn’t work the other way around, otherwise I’d be a writer and I’d have invented Claremont’s X-Men.
If you don’t know how to invent, you can describe.
Describe what? I haven’t got a vision.
I’d be boring, because I think that deep down things aren’t one way or the other.
Yesterday I had breakfast at the bar.
There was this gangly dude at the counter with some chick. She had her back turned, high heels, an ugly ski jacket and tight pants, her ass on display.
It wasn’t bad, the ass. It just didn’t go well with her gym-heavy legs.
I thought, she’s probably got an ugly face, and then she turned around and, yeah, she looked like an anteater.
The gangly dude was interested, you could tell.
In his circle the anteater-woman is considered hot, or she wouldn’t go out wearing those pants. If she thought she had a nice ass, somebody must have told her.”

EMAIL, EXTRACT (TO HECTOR, 2006)

“My fake nails are going yellow after the umpteenth bath
like, those endless ones with the Barbies
with the TV on the toilet seat until my feet boil.
I didn’t dream anything about anything,
I fell asleep like a turd
and apparently, inexplicably shouted in my sleep,
1200, 1300:
and turned my elbows,
pointy again like they used to be.
Mmumble.
It’s hot outside and good news make me tremble
and wonder what rock’s going to fall on my head and when.
Tonight I’m watching Almodovar,
in a modern suburban cinema at the mall, with popcorn and Turkish knick-knacks:
you know, furry seat covers, tigers and streams with fake water and optical illusions.”


3.
“Once in a while it seems like everything’s falling apart.
Around me it's like a demolition, like when they bomb buildings from the inside to make them implode: everything disintegrates, falls in on itself, without damaging the surroundings, in the most complete silence.
Everything suspended and me in the middle, immovable.
It must be the same for everyone and in someone else’s eyes I disintegrate together with the rest.
Earlier, in the chaos, I used to repeat to myself, I’m a cliff.
Now there’s a sentence going round in my head that I read in a friend’s notebook, Every step is moving me up, and I feel a little ashamed for being so irresponsible.
My best friend’s been leaving his house as little as possible, for years. He’s reduced his needs to the bare minimum, like a fat plant.
In the end I adapted to that format: I got used to almost always seeing him waist up in the Skype window, like Steel Jeeg’s father.
There’s another friend I’m not talking to.
He’s got his own world of reference that’s different from mine but also similar and, in a way, we’ve been crossing over for years.
I’ve never stopped talking to someone, not even once.
That’s another thing that’s disintegrated into silence. It’s not even a real fight.
When you’re young you’ve got loads of time: one thing this year, another the next. Afterwards everything shifts perspective because there’s no imagination and you’re overwhelmed.
I remember one of my father’s birthdays. I made him a tape of all this acoustic stuff, like Nick Drake.
The cover was a photo of JFK standing in a field. I cut it out of an article on the fall of the Kennedy myth, called Smashing Camelot.
Why did I choose that one?
Maybe I wanted to comfort him because I could tell he was going through a crisis: to say, Come on, mythology doesn’t die.
Or I wanted to lash out at his moment of internal doubt. I don’t know.
A few days later I go to my friend’s house and find out he’s made a tape for his dad as well.
Nick Drake, plus other acoustic stuff.
I remember he said, Nick Drake is a dad thing.
His cover was Alec Guinness dressed as Obi-Wan Kenobi, with the brown cape and laser sword.
We always silenced that side of it: better the base, grotesque inflection of the mythological parallel.
In that sense, an abominable character like Uncle Bully in Once Were Warriors becomes a point of reference.
Last summer I bumped into this guy I know. He’s the son of an actor, he sort of directs and always seems a little self-effacing, he’s probably shy.
He told me he was about to leave, going on vacation to Vietnam and Cambodia with some friends.
I heard the couplet Vietnam-Cambodia and mentally translated, Apocalypse Now.
I thought of Hot Shots! 2, the scene where Charlie Sheen runs into his father in Vietnam. He’s on a boat, dressed up all Viet-movie: another boat’s coming from the opposite direction and on it there’s Martin Sheen, wearing what he did in Apocalypse Now.
When they cross paths, they look at each other, point and say in unison, I loved you in Wall Street!
‘Cause they were both in Wall Street, the Oliver Stone movie.
It’s genius, definitive.
I described the scene to the guy at the bar, but he didn’t remember the movie and he didn’t laugh.
Going home, I marveled at having exhumed this awesome thing buried in my memory.
Dead drunk, I started miming a tennis serve, that’s how excited I was.
I lost my balance and fell and hurt myself really bad, I almost broke an arm.
At the hospital they said I had a concussion and prescribed a painkiller. It was strong and a downer, so I spent three days nailed to the couch with one eye half open, watching movies and smoking, floored by the opiate antagonist, elated.”

____________________________________________________________________________
(http://heavenisknowingwhoyouare.blogspot.com)




HECTOR, 1977

1.
“Nell’Uno, il figlio maggiore entra in una gang e si tatua in faccia.
Fanno l’iniziazione: lo pestano in venti e poi gli fanno il moko, il tatuaggio tradizionale maori.
Il make up del film l’ha fatto il discendente di una casta di incisori reali.
I maori tatuavano i capi tribù, imbalsamavano la loro testa quando morivano. Gli inglesi li deportavano e li mettevano nei musei, perciò hanno smesso di tatuare e si sono dedicati solo all’incisione.
Il tatuaggio che si fa lui è questo, il moko.
Jake la Furia lo vede e gli dice, Sembri un cazzo dipinto.
È così nella versione italiana. In inglese gli dice solo, Fuck, you’re too much.
Nel Due, gli stessi della gang sgobbano il Cazzo Dipinto per una faida intestina.
Jake la Furia è ridotto malissimo.
L’hanno bandito dal Royal Tavern, il pub dove va sempre nell’Uno, perché ha gonfiato tutti. Va a un altro pub ma pure quando cerca di fare a botte nessuno gli dà spago.
I figli non gli parlano più e la moglie si è messa con l’assistente sociale.
Dopo lui conosce dei boscaioli, grossi, ignoranti ma precisi. Con questi sconfigge la gang e fa pace con il figlio vivo.
Niente di che, di gran lunga inferiore all’Uno.
Il capo della gang era forte, riduceva in schiavitù la donna del Cazzo Dipinto. Scimmia, un aborigeno con i dread e i tatuaggi, ripugnante. Un vero cattivo bidimensionale.
Le risse, fiacche.
Nell’Uno ti fanno capire subito che aria tira: fino alla scena madre di Jake la Furia al pub che sfonda lo zio Bully a bottigliate.
So di gente preparata che se la rivedeva al rallentatore, tanto il realismo.
Del Due si salva giusto la scena della rapina al bancomat, con loro che non è che lo scassinano, se lo portano direttamente via con il carro attrezzi.”


EMAIL, ESTRATTO (A HECTOR, 2006)

“Sì, Julian Casablancas nel mio sogno e io in fissa:
sì, sono una ultratrentenne
e faccio sogni da adolescente e rosico perché non sono veri.
Mi sono svegliata tutta pimpante
poi mi è bastato entrare nel freddo ufficio
senza togliermi la giacca mai
per rendermi conto che niente è possibile.”




2.
“Io conservo tutto. Quando sono usciti i telefonini mi copiavo gli sms che mi piacevano su un quaderno, per non perderli.
Quando leggo le cose degli altri mi sento contorto.
Io controllo il mio mondo sovrapponendo personaggi alle persone vere.
Per forza i personaggi saranno distorti. Ma pertinenti, realistici.
Ho un armamentario mitologico pieno di precedenti con cui posso confrontarli per vedere se funzionano. Se vanno d’accordo con il disegno: la continuity, che io governo.
All’asilo per esempio veniva una, una madre. Una signora del cazzo, che odiavo, che parlava con gli occhi sgranati e si produceva in sorrisi artificiali con tutti.
Aveva il naso enorme e i dentoni, il profilo da squalo, perciò l’avevo soprannominata la Signora Jabberjaw, come il cartone di Hannah-Barbera.
Oppure. Ho lavorato per certi, che mi vessavano.
I capi, assatanati. Dopo un po’ mi ha assalito il senso dell’assurdo e ho cominciato a immaginarmeli come dei dementi che giocavano a Risiko.
Ha un senso. Conquistare la totalità dell’America e dell’Asia è come lavorare a ciclo continuo: è fine a se stesso.
Senza questo giochetto, la vista della realtà è insopportabile.
Purtroppo alla rovescia non funziona, se no sarei uno scrittore e avrei inventato gli X-Men di Claremont.
Se non sai inventare, puoi descrivere.
Descrivere che? Io non ho una visione.
Sarei noioso, perché penso che in fondo le cose non sono in nessun modo.
Ieri ho fatto colazione al bar.
Al banco c’era uno spilungone con una. Lei di spalle, tacchi alti, un piumino brutto e i pantaloni aderenti, con il culo in bella vista.
Non era brutto, il culo. Solo non stava bene con le gambe, massicce da palestra.
Ho pensato, Avrà un brutto viso, infatti si è girata e sembrava un formichiere.
Lo spilungo era interessato, si vedeva.
Nel giro suo la donna-formichiere è considerata una fica, o non uscirebbe con quei pantaloni. Se pensa di avere un bel culo, qualcuno deve averglielo detto


EMAIL, ESTRATTO (A HECTOR, 2006)

“Ho le unghie finte che stanno diventando gialle dopo l’ennesimo bagno
tipo quelli eterni con le Barbie
con la tv sul water fino a che avevo i piedi bolliti.
Non ho sognato niente di niente,
mi sono addormentata come una cacca
e inspiegabilmente pare che nel sonno urlassi,
1200, 1300:
e roteassi i gomiti,
di nuovo puntuti come un tempo.
Mmumble.
Fa caldo fuori e le buone notizie mi fanno tremare
e pensare quale sasso mi cadrà in testa e quando.
Stasera vedrò Almodóvar
in un cinema moderno periferico al centro commerciale,
con i popcorn e i ninnoli turchi:
cioè coperte pelose, tigri e ruscelli con l’acqua finta e illusioni ottiche.”


3.
“Ogni tanto mi sembra che tutto va a pezzi.
Intorno a me è tipo demolizione, quando minano i palazzi da dentro per farli implodere: tutto si disintegra, crolla su se stesso, senza danno per le cose circostanti, nel silenzio più totale.
Tutto sospeso e io in mezzo, imperturbabile.
Deve essere uguale per tutti e io agli occhi di un altro mi disintegro con il resto.
Prima, nel caos, mi ripetevo, Io sono una scogliera.
Ora mi suona in testa una frase che ho letto sul quaderno di una mia amica, Every step is moving me up, e un po’ mi vergogno di essere così incosciente.
Il mio migliore amico esce di casa il meno possibile, da anni. Ha ridotto i suoi bisogni al minimo, tipo pianta grassa.
Mi sono adattato a questa forma, alla fine: mi sono abituato a vederlo quasi solo a mezzo busto nella finestra di Skype, come il padre di Jeeg Robot.
Ho un altro amico con cui non parlo.
Ha un suo mondo di riferimento diverso ma simile al mio e, in un certo senso, per anni insieme abbiamo fatto dei crossover.
Non mi è mai successo di non parlare più con qualcuno, neanche una volta.
È un’altra cosa disintegrata nel silenzio, infatti. Non è nemmeno una lite vera e propria.
Da pischello hai tanto tempo: un anno questo, un anno quello. Dopo si ridimensiona tutto perché manca la fantasia e tu sei travolto.
Mi ricordo un compleanno di mio padre. Gli avevo fatto una cassetta di quasi tutte cose acustiche tipo Nick Drake.
La copertina era una foto di JFK in un prato. L’avevo ritagliata da un articolo sulla caduta del mito dei Kennedy, si chiamava Smashing Camelot.
Perché ho scelto proprio quella?
Forse volevo confortarlo perché lo vedevo in crisi: dire, Dai, la mitologia non muore.
Oppure volevo infierire su un suo momento di dubbio interiore. Non so.
Qualche giorno dopo vado a casa del mio amico e vedo che anche lui ha fatto una cassetta per suo padre.
Sempre Nick Drake, più altre cose acustiche.
Mi ricordo che ha detto, Nick Drake è una cosa da padri.
La sua copertina era Alec Guinness vestito da Obi-Wan Kenobi, con la cappa marrone e la spada laser.
Abbiamo sempre taciuto questo versante della cosa: sempre meglio la declinazione deteriore e grottesca del paragone mitologico.
In questa chiave, un personaggio abominevole come lo zio Bully di Once Were Warriors diventa un punto di riferimento.
L’estate scorsa in un bar ho incontrato questo tipo che conosco. È il figlio di un attore, fa un po’ il regista e ha sempre l’aria dimessa, deve essere timido.
Mi ha detto che stava per partire, andava in vacanza in Vietnam e Cambogia con degli amici suoi.
Io ho sentito il binomio Vietnam-Cambogia e ho tradotto mentalmente, Apocalypse Now.
Ho pensato a Hot Shots! 2, la scena dove Charlie Sheen incrocia il padre in Vietnam.
Lui sta sul battello, tutto vestito da viet-movie: un altro battello viene nella direzione opposta e sopra c’è Martin Sheen, vestito come in Apocalypse Now.
Quando si incrociano, si fissano, si indicano e dicono in coro, Sei stato grande in Wall Street!
Perché tutti e due erano in Wall Street, di Oliver Stone.
È geniale, definitivo.
Ho raccontato tutta la scena al tipo al bar, ma non si ricordava il film e non ha riso.
Tornando a casa mi beavo di aver riesumato questa ficata sepolta nella memoria.
Ubriaco perso, mi sono messo a fare il movimento del servizio a tennis, tanto ero fomentato.
Ho perso l’equilibrio e sono caduto facendomi malissimo, mi sono quasi rotto un braccio.
All’ospedale mi hanno detto che avevo una contusione e mi hanno prescritto un antidolorifico. Era potente e morfinoso, per cui ho passato tre giorni stampato sul divano con l’occhio a mezz’asta, a vedere film e a fumare, schienato dall’antagonista oppioide, contentissimo.”


____________________________________________________________________________
(http://heavenisknowingwhoyouare.blogspot.com)


(01/2)