Andrea Büttner and Alessandro Pessoli at Collezione Maramotti

from Autumn 2011
Collezione Maramotti – Via Fratelli Cervi 66 – Reggio Emilia

This autumn Collezione Maramotti will present The Poverty of Riches (November 13, 2011 – April 29, 2012), introducing the work of Andrea Büttner, the winner of the third “Max Mara Art Prize for Womenin collaboration with the Whitechapel Gallery; and the exhibition Fiamma pilota le ombre seguono (October 30, 2011 – January 29, 2012 ) by Alessandro Pessoli.

The Poverty of Riches was first exhibited in April 2011 at Whitechapel Gallery. The works will be acquired by Collezione Maramotti where they will be exhibited from 13 November 2011. Andrea Büttner is fascinated by the life of religious communities. Her work explores the crossover between religion and art, and the similarities between religious communities and the art world. The Collezione Maramotti exhibition showcases new works of art made by Büttner after winning the Prize, inspired by encounters the artist had during her six-month residency in Italy, awarded as a result of winning the Prize. During her Italian residency, Büttner spent time with monastic groups, Giotto’s frescoes and works from the Collezione Maramotti: Alberto Burri, Enrico Castellani and Piero Manzoni.

Büttner uses the traditional technique of woodcuts to depict religious iconography such as a loaf of bread, a table and St. Francis. Alongside this traditional imagery, everyday textiles from the uniforms from park wardens, policemen and refuse collectors create colourful ‘paintings’ when stretched like canvases. These paintings form part of her exploration of the symbolic use of fabric in Italian religious art. Simple benches offer a place to sit and reflect, drawing parallels between the spaces of a church and a gallery. Also on display are posters, cloth and leaflets, all inspired by Andrea Büttner’s time spent in monasteries.

The artist’s work engages with the notion of poverty both from an aestethic as well as from a spiritual point of view hence Büttner’s articulation of a connection between the rejection of wealth by monastic movements and the choice of materials used for the creation of artworks during the Arte Povera movement, seemingly eschewing mass media and the art market. Another central theme is the link between poverty and shame. As Büttner articulates in the 21st century, poverty is considered extremely shameful, and shame is viewed and lived as a negative feeling. The artist is interested instead in its positive understanding, in its heuristic dimension and also in art.

Fiamma pilota le ombre seguono is characterized by three large canvases echo and reflect one another evocatively, taking as their matrix, their “pilot light”, the complex subject of the Crucifixion. Pessoli’s painting is eclectic, rich in memories and historical sedimentations (from metaphysics via surrealism to popular visual culture) with which it shares an empathetic bond, succeeding perfectly in interiorising the sense of a continuity running through the history of art. In this exhibition, as in other works that the artist has produced recently, images belonging to a religious iconographic tradition are brought up to date and become vehicles of potential figural reinventions. With this background register forever present, Pessoli reinvents and recalibrates the forms and emotive intensity of these figures, setting up an intimate dialogue between them and the landscape into which they are absorbed, according them a varied lightness and creating a balance between drama and pictorial playfulness. As for his method, Pessoli’s work is constructed using a free mix of techniques and styles: the artisanal, manual quality of collage and spray paint applied over stencils is fused with the more traditional pictorial gesture, becoming an integral part of it.

Pessoli’s painting is thus created through a process of linguistic construction and deconstruction, both symbolic and physical, in which the erased, covered, leftover parts often constitute the painting’s basic structure, in search of an interior truth that is manifested in the vitality of the image and the brushstroke, an objective that the artist is continually striving to achieve in his work. Painting has always been for Pessoli a language of choice, from the start of his career in the 1980s right up until today.

This exhibition is part of the Collezione Maramotti’s ongoing programme of occasional displays of works by invited artists which then become part of the permanent collection, the aim being to combine the activity of enhancing the collection’s holdings of artworks through new acquisitions with that of promoting the public enjoyment of those same works.

Image above: Andrea Büttner - Table, 2010 – woodcut on paper – 147 x 142 cm  - Edition of 10 - © Andrea Büttner

bredpebble

Andrea Büttner
Breadpebble
paint on glass
39 x 30 cm
© Andrea Büttner

father

Andrea Büttner
Father, 2010
woodcut on paper
218 x 136 cm
Edition of 10
© Andrea Büttner

manwithfabric

Andrea Büttner
Man with fabric, 2010
woodcut on paper dyptich
118 x 177 cm + 118 x 177 cm
Edizione in 10 copie/ Edition of 10
© Andrea Büttner

tears

Andrea Büttner
Tears, 2010
woodcut on paper
120 x 180 cm
© Andrea Büttner

vogelpredigt

Andrea Büttner
Vogelpredigt, 2010
woodcut on paper dyptich
180 x 117 cm + 180 x 117 cm
© Andrea Büttner

exhibition-image

Installation view

Alessandro Pessoli, Fiamma Polota - 2011

Alessandro Pessoli
Fiamma pilota, 2011
oil, enamel, spraypaint on canvas
195 x 300 cm
© Alessandro Pessoli
Ph. C. Fredrik Nilsen

Alessandro Pessoli, Le Figure Tornano A Casa - 2011 - 2011

Alessandro Pessoli
Le figure tornano a casa, 2011
oil, enamel, spraypaint on canvas
195 x 300 cm
© Alessandro Pessoli
Ph. C. Fredrik Nilsen

Alessandro Pessoli, Testa Farfalla Su Matrice Locomotiva - 2011

Alessandro Pessoli
Testa farfalla su matrice locomotiva, 2011
oil, enamel, spraypaint on canvas
195 x 300 cm
© Alessandro Pessoli
Ph. C. Fredrik Nilsen