Ydessa Hendeles The Bird that Made the Breeze to Blow

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Jun 05 -  Aug 11, 2012

Johann Konig – Dessauer Strabe 6/7 Berlin

Renowned for her pioneering site-specific installations staging contemporary art, found objects and historical artifacts, the Toronto-based Hendeles’s debut show in Berlin continues her interpretative exploration of cultural iconography to explore dualities and power relations, and in particular the power dynamics of the group in relation to the individual. As in earlier shows, her artistic decisions are inspired and informed by her interest in human gregariousness and our inclination to bond in pairs and in groups, defining ourselves by alliances determined by design or by fate. This Berlin exhibition conjures the past from the vantage point of the present, offering a personal perspective on a postwar culture uniquely defined by high expectations and hopes for the future, while also laden with heavy burdens and responsibilities.

This show marks Hendeles’s identity transition from exhibition-making as a curator to exhibition-making as an artist. THE BIRD THAT MADE THE BREEZE TO BLOW challenges conventional assumptions about the boundaries between artistic production, collecting, curating and exhibiting. The show is conceived to provide viewers with the integrated experience of an art installation, but it is also presented as a group of autonomous works, each standing on its own outside the context of the exhibition. It is comprised of photographs and text pieces in conjunction with antique clockwork key-wind tin toys and a custom-fabricated, painted-metal automaton that performs in a large mahogany vitrine.This is Hendeles’s third show in Germany, following the critically acclaimed Partners (Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2003) and Marburg! The Early Bird! (2010). As gallerist and exhibition-maker, she has mounted more than 100 exhibitions, and began to incorporate her own artistic constructs in her curatorial practice in 1993 and pursued her artistic approach to curating in 2002 with The Teddy Bear Project. This was first seen in sameDIFFERENCE (2002) at her space in Toronto, subsequently remounted in Partners (2003), and then again in Noah’s Ark (National Gallery of Canada, 2004) and most recently, at Massimiliano Gioni’s invitation, in 10000 Lives (Gwangju Biennale, South Korea, 2010). Other Hendeles projects include: The Denslow’s Mother Goose Project in Predators & Prey (2006) and Survivors (The Punch and Judy Project) in Dead! Dead! Dead! (2007), both in Toronto, and Church and State (The Puss in Boots Project) in Marburg! The Early Bird! (2010) at the Kunstverein in the artist’s native Marburg. This show was named 2011 Exhibition of the Year by the Ontario Association of Art Galleries, which cited it as “the strongest example—among many—of how Ydessa Hendeles has made curating an art form of its own.” Her most recent show, and her first in New York, was The Wedding (The Walker Evans Project), for Andrea Rosen Gallery, in December 2011.

Image above : Ydessa Hendeles,  Marburg! The Early Bird!, 2010-2011 (detail), windup toy, LightJet print  in ebonized  maple frame,sculpture: 7.5 cm diameter x 5 cm high (train); 17.5 x 17.5 cm (cardboard base) ,vitrine: 29 x 22 x 22.5 cm  framed print:  58.1 x 49.8

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Ydessa Hendeles

Partners (Minnie Mouse Carrying Felix in Cages), 2002

four LightJet prints in ebonized maple  frames

81.3 x 64.1 cm

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Ydessa Hendeles

Aero-Car N° 500, 2011 (detail)

aluminium, electric  motors, custom-made mahogany display vitrine, cast-aluminium key

Car: 88.2 x 314.9 x 99.1 cm

Car with  extended wings: 88.2 x 314.9 x 321.9 cm

Vitrine: 253 x 510.5 x 368.6 cm Key: 8.7 x 41.3 x 44.8 cm

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Ydessa Hendeles

THE BIRD THAT MADE THE BREEZE TO BLOW (PART ONE—PART ELEVEN), 2011

Eleven inkjet prints in ebonized  poplar frames

each frame:  156.21 x 122.71

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Ydessa Hendeles

Hallowe’en Girl, 2006

LightJet print  in ebonized  poplar  frame

156.21 x 122.71 cm

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Ydessa Hendeles

The Dead Jumbo., 2011 (detail)

Four inkjet prints in ebonized  poplar  frames,  wind-up toy

“The  Dead Jumbo.” (one framed inkjet print): 168.6 x 122.7 cm

“The  Death of Jumbo” (three framed inkjet prints): 156.2 x 122.7 cm each

“French Bulldog” (wind-up toy): 16.7 x 21 x 7 cm photo: Stephen  Richards

Marburg! The Early Bird!, 2010-2011

windup toy, LightJet print  in ebonized  maple frame

sculpture: 7.5 cm diameter x 5 cm high (train); 17.5 x 17.5 cm (cardboard base)

vitrine: 29 x 22 x 22.5 cm  framed print:  58.1 x 49.8

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Ydessa Hendeles

The Dead Jumbo., 2011 (detail)

Four inkjet prints in ebonized  poplar  frames,  wind-up toy

“The  Dead Jumbo.” (one framed inkjet print): 168.6 x 122.7 cm

“The  Death of Jumbo” (three framed inkjet prints): 156.2 x 122.7 cm each

“French Bulldog” (wind-up toy): 16.7 x 21 x 7 cm photo: Stephen  Richards

Marburg! The Early Bird!, 2010-2011

windup toy, LightJet print  in ebonized  maple frame

sculpture: 7.5 cm diameter x 5 cm high (train); 17.5 x 17.5 cm (cardboard base)

vitrine: 29 x 22 x 22.5 cm  framed print:  58.1 x 49.8

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Ydessa Hendeles

Marburg Madonna, 2007

medical lamp (by André  Walter),  miniature examination table, two artist’s mannequins, custom-made mahogany display vitrine

female  mannequin: 48.9 cm high

male mannequin: 50.8 cm high table: 60.96 x 26.67 x 45.72 cm medical lamp: 96.52 x 104.14 cm vitrine: 190.5 x 121.9 x 198.1

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Ydessa Hendeles

Canadian Child, 2009

over-sized  bicycle bell, inkjet print  (family album photograph) in ebonized  maple frame sculpture: 81 x 61 x 56 cm

plinth: 34.3 x 121.9 x 121.9

framed print:  62.5 x 57.8